Attach Symbol: Down-Bow – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Attach Symbol: Down-Bow

More of the Scoring Editor “part box” tools. Long post of the lack of documentation for the part box and symbology.

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Region Automation: Control Change 29 – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Region Automation: Control Change 29

See the post Region Automation: Control Change 20 for an in depth description.

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Attach Symbol: Jazz 3 – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Attach Symbol: Jazz 3

See the very long posting about Jazz Symbols and weak documentation at Attach Symbol: Jazz 5

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Logic Pro X Plug-Ins: Compressor, Limiter and Other Dynamic Tools

Logic Pro X Plug-Ins: Compressor, Limiter and Other Dynamic Tools:

Using Logic Pro X to control the dynamics of your overall mix as well as individual instruments is a crucial fundamental of mixing. Logic Pro’s compressor is your main tool for controlling dynamics as well as for effect. Compressors work well on individual sounds, groups of instruments or sounds, and even the entire mix. There are many types of dynamic control, include limiting, multiband compression, de-essing, gating, envelope shaping, side chaining, and parallel compression. Here, you learn how to use the dynamics tools of Logic Pro to create powerful and interesting mixes.

 By Graham English

Q. How do I make guitars sound more ‘epic’? |

Q. How do I make guitars sound more ‘epic’? |:

I’ve been struggling with recording and mixing ‘epic’ guitar sounds. I’m after something that balances aggression with tone, but which doesn’t sound too distorted like so many contemporary hard-rock records do today. Do you have any tips that might help?

Great tips from Mike Senior as usual.

Show/Hide Event List – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Show/Hide Event List

Open/Close the Event List on the right side of the Arrange window. This has no effect on the Event List window that is created by dragging the Event header from the lists display.

Event List overview – Logic Pro X:

The Event List is the most powerful, flexible, and complete MIDI editor in Logic Pro. All MIDI event types are listed alphanumerically in the Event List.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

6 Times to Automate EQ for Effect

6 Times to Automate EQ for Effect:

For mixing engineers and producers alike, it pays to become intimately acquainted with the virtues of automation. Swooping sounds from left to right, enhancing emotion with level boosts, or fixing complicated problems with real-time adjustments—all of these moves separate the quotidian from the marvelous.

But riddle me this: how often do you think about automating EQ? Perhaps not as often as you should, for automating EQ can create both dramatic and transparent effects. Whether creating something truly bespoke for your mix, or cheating an element forward/backward for the master, a bit of active, automated EQ sculpting can be a serious boon, if done well.

Here are some instances where you can employ the practice.

7 Creative Automation Tips for Music Producers

7 Creative Automation Tips for Music Producers:

Earlier this year, we discussed mix automation basics, detailing how the process works and why it benefits your music. If you still need clarification on these points I suggest taking a look at the article, because in this post we’ll be diving deeper into automation with seven creative tips, applicable to all genres.

Get the Most from DAW Automation: 3 Creative Approaches

Get the Most from DAW Automation: 3 Creative Approaches:

In the early 1970s the recording industry changed drastically with the introduction of mixing consoles that could record and play back fader movement. Leading up to this, mixing multitrack tape recordings was a group effort. For larger sessions of 16 or 24 tracks, up to four people could be needed behind the desk just to manage faders.

Digital audio workstations (DAWs) sophisticated the entire automation process, providing creators and engineers with the ability to control nearly every parameter with precision. In this article, I’ll show you three ways to use automation for more expressive, stand-out music.

What Is Mix Automation? Everything You’ve Been Too Afraid to Ask

What Is Mix Automation? Everything You’ve Been Too Afraid to Ask:

In this article, I will try to answer all the questions you’ve always had about mix automation but were too afraid to ask. We’ll go over what automation is, why you’ll want to use, and the basics. To learn three creative applications of using automation in a DAW, check out this article.

Automation in the Audio Mastering World: Leveling up Your Ozone 8 Skills with Tasteful Automation

Automation in the Audio Mastering World: Leveling up Your Ozone 8 Skills with Tasteful Automation:

Automation isn’t just for mixing engineers. Neither is automation strictly limited to volume rides. Whether you’re working in the analog or digital world—or relying on a hybrid audio mastering setup—there are a handful of circumstances where time-based adjustments on your mastering chain can help you achieve your desired results. Let’s look into a few practical examples of automation being used in recent mastering sessions.

Beat Making 101: How to Make a Beat

Beat Making 101: How to Make a Beat:

In this article, we’ll discuss how beats are constructed and how to get into beat-making. We’ll break down the essential aspects of a standard beat, listening techniques, exercises to develop your abilities, and various resources to use in the learning process.

Linear Axis View – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Linear Axis View

In the Score Editor ‘View’ menu – View Mode>Linear View. This is one of the “oddball” commands. The full text of the command makes no particular sense. The word “axis” appears infrequently in the documentation, usually referring to the timeline.

Simply put – change the view of the score to a single line.

View tracks as music notation in the Score Editor – Logic Pro X:

Linear view: Shows a single software instrument track in a continuous, horizontally scrolling view. Linear view is the standard view for editing the score.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Add Reference Plugins Into Your Workflow | pureMix.net

Add Reference Plugins Into Your Workflow | pureMix.net:

Referencing is a critical part of mixing. It allows you to compare your song against well-mixed music in a similar style. In addition to giving you a reality check and ideas for treating various mix elements, it helps mitigate the acoustical issues often found in untreated studios, by providing you with a baseline to compare your mix with. There’s a lot to discuss about this subject, and Fab Dupont covers it thoroughly in the pureMix video, “How to Listen-Reference Mixes.” The full video is available to pureMix Pro Members, but in this free excerpt, Fab talks about using plug-ins that are specifically designed to help you reference more effectively.

Articulation ⌃⇧D – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Articulation    ⌃⇧D

Toggle Articulation view in the Event Editor. Only available in the “View” menu when region data is present. If the Event Editor is at the “track” level the options does not show up. You have to open a MIDI region to view the Articulation data.

Articulation “sets” allow you to alter the sound of an instrument (e.g. orchestral violin) by using a “mark” to denote style. Think about staccato or marcato, or tenuto. It is the language of the orchestral score. Jazz players have a different set of articulations, but it is similar. Think doit, fall, or scoop.

The mechanics of the articulation mark are a MIDI event, often ‘Note On’, of a particular value which is not in the range that the instrument can play. Logic allows you to create sets of articulations, each set up to 254 IDs with control over MIDI channel, and a symbol that can be used in the Score Editor to indicate a different articulation.

Each articulation can be associated with a switch, and output(s) that can be used to control MIDI devices.

As I think about this I wonder if I could create a MIDI region consisting of Articulations alone that can be used as “macros” to control devices.

Meanwhile, I should practice using articulations to control my orchestral instruments (Miroslav Philharmonik) and practice with Logic’s “Studio Horns” and “Studio Strings”.

Extra credit if I build a functional articulation set for my orchestra and share it with the world.

Manage articulations with the Articulation Set Editor – Logic Pro X:

The Articulation Set Editor can be used to create sophisticated key switch and controller switch definitions, and define output transformations, which enables compatibility with third party sample libraries. You can also use the Articulation Set Editor to create Articulation Sets for instruments that have assigned Articulation IDs to sample groups, but do not have pre-configured articulations. For example, some EXS instruments come pre-configured with specific sample groups identified by an Articulation ID but do not have pre-configured Articulation Sets. For more information on how the EXS uses Articulation IDs, see Articulation ID handling.

 

 Manage articulations for software instruments – Logic Pro X:

If an Articulation Set is loaded, you can select between articulations using the Articulations pop-up menu in the plug-in window header. Some software instruments let you view the most recently played articulation in the plug-in interface as well.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND