Stems In Music Production – Everything You Need To Know | Production Expert

Stems In Music Production – Everything You Need To Know | Production Expert

The main thing to bear in mind is that you’ll need to duplicate some resources here. On a regular mix you only need one of every effect, say reverb and one delay. But when stemming you need one of these for every stem, routed to the relevant stem bus. Otherwise, you’d have the effects of all the different stems on one stem, and the point is to separate things. So if you’re creating four stems you’ll need four sets of effects busses. You can imagine how quickly this will start to take up system resources if you’re printing a lot of stems, and especially if you’re working in 5.1 or 7.1

Simple enough to create effects tracks for each stem. Just have to remember to do it when mixing the project.

In the Logic Pro X world, if you’re using summing stacks, you might simply want to insert the effects on the stack and use the mix control knob to adjust the levels appropriately. If the recipient of the stems insists on separate effects tracks per stem, well, OK…that’s just not that hard to do.

A good practice would be to create a track for the effects bus (need to do this anyway if you want to bounce the stems) and place it right along with the summing stack in the arrange area.

Record off for all – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Record off for all

Turns off “Record” for all channels. I can’t seem to find any specific documentation for this.

“Record off for all” is mapped to OPTION+REC button on an MCU. If you press and hold OPTION, then press REC all channels will have Record turned off.

Mackie Control channel strips (1 to 8) – Control Surfaces Help

OPTION
Disable Record Enable button for all tracks.

 

Settings: Chords and Grids ⌃⌥⇧C – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Settings: Chords and Grids    ⌃⌥⇧C

Open the Score Editor settings in “Project Preferences” to the ‘Chords and Grids’ section.

Chord settings

  • Root Font field: Defines the font for the chord symbol’s root note.

  • Extension Font field: Defines the font for the chord symbol’s extensions.

  • “Follow staff size” checkbox: Displays chord symbols according to staff size.

  • Slash Note Position pop-up menu: Defines the position of the slash note.

  • Accidental Scale field: Changes the accidental size, in relation to the font size setting: positive values result in an increased size, negative values in a diminished size of chord symbol accidentals.

  • Language pop-up menu: Choose which language to use for accidentals and other chord symbols.

  • Alignment pop-up menu: Determines the general horizontal alignment of chord symbols—with an Align parameter set to def (default)—in relation to their bar position.

Grid settings

  • Font field: Sets the general grid font.

  • Grid Scaling: Reduced field: Sets the size of the first chord grid when added in the Score Editor.

  • Grid Scaling: Normal field: Sets the size of the second chord grid when added in the Score Editor.

  • Grid Scaling: Enlarged field: Sets the size of the third chord grid when added in the Score Editor.

  • Chord Scaling: Reduced field: Sets the size of the chord on the first chord grid when added in the Score Editor.

  • Chord Scaling: Normal field :Sets the size of the chord on the second chord grid when added in the Score Editor.

  • Chord Scaling: Enlarged field: Sets the size of the chord on the third chord grid when added in the Score Editor.

  • Show Fingering checkboxes: Select to show the fingering numbers on the chord grid symbols in the Score Editor.

  • Minimum Number of Frets field: Defines the number of frets (four, five, or six) on chord grids.

  • Barre buttons: Define the Barre style on chord grids, whether Tie or Block.

  • Thumb buttons: Define the representation of the Thumb fingering marking on chord grids. It can be represented by a 5 or a T.

  • Left-Handed checkbox: Changes the chord grid orientation for a left-handed user.

Chords & Grids settings in Logic Pro - Apple Support

 

These settings define the font, position, and scaling of chords and grids, and other settings.

 

 

Open General Preferences… – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Open General Preferences...

Opens the Preferences settings window with the “General” tab selected. If you use the command-comma key command to open the Preferences settings window it will open with the most recently selected tab.

Not really a candidate for its own keyboard sequence, but you can if you need to.

Overview of preferences in Logic Pro – Apple Support

In Logic Pro, you can define and modify preferences that apply to all projects. You do this in the Preferences window. These preferences are automatically saved whenever you quit the application. A general preferences file, named com.apple.logic10.plist, is found in the ~/Library/Preferences folder. A separate preferences file for control surfaces, named com.apple.logic.pro.cs, is stored in the same location. You can’t edit either file directly. Any changes must be made in Logic Pro. If you delete a preferences file, a new one is created the next time you open Logic Pro. All preferences are reset to their default values.

 

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by Nudge Value ⌥← – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Nudge Region/Event Position Left by Nudge Value    ⌥←

Moves the starting position of the event to the left by the Nudge Value. Quick way to get things lined up to be sample/frame/beat aligned. I typically show the toolbar and set the nudge value there. Just a simple reminder of the settings.

Move regions in the Logic Pro Tracks area – Apple Support

You can nudge regions (move them in small increments) left or right using key commands. To nudge regions, you first set the nudge value, then move selected regions by this value. Alternatively, you can nudge regions by a set value.

 

– Control Surface Install Window – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  - Control Surface Install Window

This is a grouping header in the Key Commands window. First time I have had one come up in my random selection of commands. Kind of amusing, too. There are only two commands contained within the group.

Command    Key Touch Bar
- Control Surface Install Window
Scan for Selected Models
Add Selected Models

Add a control surface to Logic Pro – Apple Support

Some control surfaces such as Mackie Control are detected automatically when you open Logic Pro. You can add other devices that are not detected automatically using the Setup window. Installation is covered in the setup section for your particular device. Some devices may require different or additional steps, but in most cases you only need to select the name of the device you want to use with Logic Pro, then add it. When you add a control surface device, it is represented by an icon in the Device area of the Control Surface Setup window.

 

Next note will be flat ⇧B – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Next note will be flat ⇧B

When using the Step Input Keyboard pressing shift-B indicates that the next note input will be flat. Shift-3 for sharp.

Use step input recording in Logic Pro – Apple Support

Step input allows you to insert MIDI notes when you’re not recording in real time. You can use step input to create note runs that may be too fast for you to play or to replicate sheet music that’s too difficult for you to play.

Power to the People: Simple DIY Mastering with Ozone

Power to the People: Simple DIY Mastering with Ozone

by Jett Galindo, iZotope Contributor June 29, 2020

Today’s innovations in music technology have empowered everyday creators to explore more complex production techniques. One thing, however, has remained a seemingly intimidating task for many: mastering. To the non-mastering engineer, it’s a discipline still shrouded in mystery, with many “how-to” resources overwhelming the everyday reader with technical jargon and difficult-to-digest techniques. And within the fast-growing DIY community, there still lies the challenge of not having easy access to state-of-the-art listening environments or professional mastering studios.

Export All Tracks as Audio Files… ⇧⌘E – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Export All Tracks as Audio Files...    ⇧⌘E

Export all audio, software instrument, and Drummer tracks as audio files. This command can be used to export effects buses as well – make sure the effects channel has a track created for it.

Fast and efficient way to create “stems” for sharing with others.

Export tracks as audio files in Logic Pro – Apple Support

You can export one or more selected tracks as audio files, or export all tracks (all audio, software instrument, and Drummer tracks) in a project as audio files—one file per track. When you export tracks as audio files, you can specify the naming of the audio files using filename elements.

 

Recall Screenset 5x ⇧5 – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Recall Screenset 5x    ⇧5

Recall screenset(s) 50 through 59. There can be 99 screensets – a lot, but you could use a screenset per scene in a video, possibly.

Create, recall, and switch screensets – Logic Pro X

You position windows in a layout that suits the way you work. This layout of various windows, including their display size, zoom levels, position, and other settings, is called a screenset. Once defined, you can save, and freely switch between different screensets, much as you might between different computer displays.

 Create and recall screensets in Logic Pro – Apple Support

You don’t need to save screensets with an explicit command. It happens automatically, as soon as you switch to another screenset. Thus, without any effort, your current working view is always stored as the current screenset.

 

Select Next Project – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Select Next Project

You can have multiple projects open at the same time. Typical advice is to not do this. Which project is “next”? The behavior is not documented anywhere, as well as a lack of documentation describing how projects are numbers – see the ‘Open Project nn’ commands.

Open Logic Pro projects – Apple Support

You can open an existing project to continue working. You can also open several projects simultaneously, allowing you to copy or move data between them, or to compare different versions of a project.

 

Quantize 1/8 & 1/8 Triplet – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Quantize 1/8 & 1/8 Triplet

Quantize the selected audio or MIDI regions to an eighth-note resolution.

Quantize regions in Logic Pro – Apple Support

Quantizing involves the rhythmic correction of audio or MIDI regions to a specific time grid. Any notes not played in time are moved to the nearest position on the grid.

 

 

Marquee Ruler – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Marquee Ruler

Display the Marquee Stripe which is just below the time/bars rulers, and above the global tracks. It is very thin, and hard to detect with the modern, dark background to windows. I have “Set Locators by Marquee Selection” turned on most of  the time so I can see the selection in the ruler – much more visible.

In Logic Pro 9 the Marquee stripe was above the rulers. Current documentation says this is still the case (in words) so you have to look at the picture closely to determine that the stripe is actually below the playhead ruler.

Select parts of regions in the Logic Pro Tracks area – Apple Support

You can select and edit parts of one or more regions, using the Marquee tool or the marquee stripe:

Open Audio File Editor… ⌘6 – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Shows Audio File Editor interface
  Open Audio File Editor…    ⌘6

Opens the Audio File Editor to work with the current track’s audio file. NB the Audio File editor is destructive!

Logic Pro Audio File Editor overview – Apple Support

Most day-to-day audio editing tasks in Logic Pro are performed in the main window and Audio Track Editor. The Audio File Editor is useful for removing pops and clicks in audio material, setting accurate crossover points for looped playback, correcting phase cancellation errors, and more.

You can use the Audio File Editor to work with transient markers that indicate significant points—or transients—in an audio file. The audio on a track is analyzed for transients the first time you enable that track for Flex Time editing. Any detected transients in the file are marked.

Important: Most edits and functions performed in the Audio File Editor are destructive. This means the actual data of audio files is changed. Although you can undo edits and processing commands, you should work with copies of your audio files, rather than the originals.

Convert Regions to New Regions ⌥⌘R – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Convert Regions to New Regions    ⌥⌘R

It is a simple matter to create a “clone” of a region. Hold down Shift and Option while dragging a region. There are now copies of the region, located at different points in the timeline, that play the same audio. If you adjust the “original” region start or end point all of the clones are adjusted as well.

More than likely the regions should be made independent so they can be adjusted individually. Use the ‘Convert Regions to New Regions’ command.

The documentation (and the menu command itself) do not agree. The documentation and menu read ‘Audio Region to New Region’ as a sub-menu item of Convert. “Edit->Convert->Audio Region to New Region”.

Clone audio regions in the Logic Pro Tracks area – Apple Support

You can clone audio regions in the Tracks area. Cloning an audio region is similar to creating an alias of a MIDI region; the clone doesn’t contain any audio data, but is only a reference to the original, and any changes to the original apply to its clones.

Part of the documentation reduction debacle of the conversion from Logic Pro 9 to Logic Pro X…The Logic Pro X documentation turned into something other than a user manual, more like a guide…sigh

Logic Pro 9 User Manual: Creating Your Arrangement

Once you have added your audio and MIDI regions to the Arrange area, you can edit and reorganize them to create an overall arrangement, or project. Most arranging and editing techniques work identically for both audio and MIDI regions. Apple Loops are also handled in a similar fashion. Where handling differs, variations are pointed out in the appropriate sections of this chapter. Note that all operations described with a pluralized heading (regions, for example), apply to one or more selected region(s).

 

 Arranging overview – Logic Pro X

After adding audio, MIDI, and Drummer regions to your project (by recording, adding loops, using Drummer or adding media files), you build the project by arranging the regions in the Tracks area. As you work in the Tracks area, you can play the project at any time to hear your latest changes.