How to Use FX Chain Transition Curves – PreSonus Blog

How to Use FX Chain Transition Curves – PreSonus Blog

FX Chains are a powerful Studio One feature, yet I can’t help but notice that when I write tips about FX Chains, some people are lost without a download…so I get the impression people might think that making FX chains is difficult. But it isn’t really, and your reward for creating one is a multi-effects processor that you can call up whenever you want, as well as assign controls that allow tweaking parameters without having to open up the effect GUIs themselves.

The VoxTool FX Chain – PreSonus Blog

The VoxTool FX Chain – PreSonus Blog

You can download the FX Chain from the link at the end of this tip; but let’s cover how the various modules affect the sound, so that (if needed) you can tweak this FX Chain for your particular voice.

The Bigness of Huge Drum Sound – PreSonus Blog

The Bigness of Huge Drum Sound – PreSonus Blog

So…you want some huge drum sounds? Here you go. This is super well-suited to hip-hop and EDM, but can also give a monster drum sound for rock. The star of this show is the Softube Saturation Knob and FX Chain Splitter.

Friday Tip: Tempo Changes for Already Mixed Songs – Reloaded – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tip: Tempo Changes for Already Mixed Songs – Reloaded – PreSonus Blog

The June 22, 2018 tip covered how to make mastered songs better with tempo changes, but there was some pushback because it wasn’t easy to make these kinds of changes in Studio One. Fortunately, it seems like the developers were listening, because it’s now far easier to change tempo. I’ve been refining various tempo-changing techniques over the past year (and had a chance to gauge reactions to songs using tempo changes compared to those that didn’t), so it seemed like the time is right to re-visit this topic.

Friday Tip: Make Mastered Songs Better with Tempo Changes – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tip: Make Mastered Songs Better with Tempo Changes – PreSonus Blog

n the process of researching an article for Sweetwater.com about what made classic rock sound “classic,” I analyzed tempo variations in songs without click tracks. The consistency of these changes was surprising. Although the changes did not have machine-like precision, they were far from being random or sloppy. They tended to follow particular patterns not only in different songs, but different genres.

Friday Tip – Panning Laws: Why They Matter – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tip – Panning Laws: Why They Matter – PreSonus Blog

You pan a mono signal from left to right. Simple, right? Actually, no. In the center, there’s a 3 dB RMS volume buildup because the same signal is in both channels. Ideally, you want the signal’s average level—its power—to have the same perceived volume, whether the sound is panned left, right, or center. Dropping the level when centered by 3 dB RMS accomplishes this. As a result, traditional hardware mixers tapered the response as you turned a panpot to create this 3 dB dip.

Definitely in the “rocket science” category. The final takeaway of the article is that pan laws will effect audio processed in different DAWs. If the panning is set “the same” in Logic Pro X and Studio One the output might not be identical.

In Logic Pro X the pan law is set on a project level. Normal is -3 dB compensated, not applied to stereo balancers.

Studio One’s Percussion Part Generator – PreSonus Blog

Studio One’s Percussion Part Generator – PreSonus Blog

Shakers, tambourines, eggs, maracas, and the like can add life and interest to a song by complementing the drum track. But it’s not always easy to play this kind of part. It has to be consistent, but not busy; humble enough to stay in the background, but strong enough to add impact…and this sounds like a job for version 4.5’s new MIDI features.

Production Expert | How To Move Sessions And Projects From One DAW Like Pro Tools To Another Like Studio One Or Logic Pro

Production Expert | How To Move Sessions And Projects From One DAW Like Pro Tools To Another Like Studio One Or Logic Pro

With more and more people using different DAWs, the need to be able to transfer a project from one DAW to another has grown. In this article we are going to show you how to move projects from one DAW, like Pro Tools, Studio and Logic Pro, to another DAW. In this article we will also cover the pitfalls in the export and import processes and how to overcome them.

Moving projects about. Very important to know how to do this.

Friday Tips: Studio One’s Secret Equalizer – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: Studio One’s Secret Equalizer – PreSonus Blog

Pop quiz: How many EQ plug-ins ship with Studio One Pro?

If you answered seven, congratulations! Then you know about the Pro EQ, the three different Fat Channel EQs, Ampire’s Graphic Equalizer, the Channel Strip, and using the Multiband Dynamics as a really hip graphic EQ. But actually, the correct answer is eight.

Friday Tips: The Air Machine – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Air Machine – PreSonus Blog:

Boosting the highs a bit is a time-honored mixing and mastering technique. You don’t want to overdo it, but a little brightness can give a song a lift, increase vocal intelligibility, articulate instruments better, and add some welcome “ear candy.” If you look at the spectral energy of a lot of hit records going back decades, you’ll often find a few extra dB of boost in the 7 to 10 kHz range, to add some “air” and sweetness.

So just boost the EQ a little bit, right? Well, that’s one option…but we can do better. The Air Machine FX Chain (Fig. 1) is equally at home on individual tracks in the Song page (try it judiciously on drums, drum room mics, acoustic guitar, piano, vocals, etc.), or on finished mixes in the Project page. And yes, there’s a download at the end so you don’t even have to create this yourself.

The download for the preset works.

Friday Tips: Attack that Autofilter!! – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: Attack that Autofilter!! – PreSonus Blog:

Studio One’s Autofilter has a sidechain, which is a good thing—because you can get some really tight, funky sounds by feeding a drum track’s send into the Autofilter’s sidechain. Then, use the Autofilter’s sidechain to modulate a track’s audio in time with the beat. Funky guitar, anyone?

Studio One 4 Pattern Editing | Sound on Sound

Studio One 4 Pattern Editing |:

Studio One 4 introduced pattern-based step sequencing as an alternative mode to the familiar piano-roll MIDI editor. It’s one of those features that makes you wonder why every DAW doesn’t already have it. It’s simple and intuitive in a way that’s reminiscent of the creative tools we’ve come to enjoy in hardware. Pattern-based sequencing is most often used for drums, but as we’ll see in this month’s workshop, the Pattern Sequencer in Studio One can be just as easily directed to synthesizer and instrument sounds, and can very quickly generate something unexpected.

I suspect this won’t work for folks who don’t subscribe to SOS. The link should work properly in about 6 months. It works for me today 😉

Friday Tips: The Center Stage Reverb – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Center Stage Reverb – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

This week’s tip is inspired by the center stage sound, but taken further. The heart of the effect is the Expander, but unlike last week’s Expander-based Dynamic Brightener tip, the Expander is in Duck mode, and fed by a sidechain. Here’s the Console setup.

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

When you play an acoustic guitar harder, it not only gets louder, but brighter. Dry, electric guitar doesn’t have that quality…by comparison, the electrified sound by itself is somewhat lifeless. But I’m not here to be negative! Let’s look at a solution that can give your dry electric guitar some more acoustic-like qualities.

I will investigate how to do this in Logic Pro X.

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

When you play an acoustic guitar harder, it not only gets louder, but brighter. Dry, electric guitar doesn’t have that quality…by comparison, the electrified sound by itself is somewhat lifeless. But I’m not here to be negative! Let’s look at a solution that can give your dry electric guitar some more acoustic-like qualities.

I will investigate how to do this in Logic Pro X.