Toggle Current Track Automation Off/Read ⌃⌘O ⌃:three: – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Toggle Current Track Automation Off/Read    ⌃⌘O    ⌃:three:

 The weird looking :three: is the symbol for touch bar button number three.

Changes the automation for the track. If you start with automation off like I do this is a handy way to turn it on for the current channel. There is also a keyboard command for toggling Latch/Read – ⌃⌘A

 

Choose automation modes – Logic Pro X:

Automation modes determine how automation tracks are treated. Automation is either being read or being written. You can independently set the automation mode for each track. You can also trim automation values and record relative automation data.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Do You Need A Subwoofer to Mix Music?

Do You Need A Subwoofer to Mix Music?:

An experienced engineer can track, mix, and master records with very little—a few plug-ins, good converters, and yes, even a pair of headphones. Listen to an episode of The Mastering Show featuring Glenn Schick, an engineer who mastered J Cole’s KOD on a pair of headphones and a mobile rig.

But there is also the sense of wanting more gear, and to this I can attest: in recent years, I’ve expanded my mastering practice, working on projects for artists like Leland Sundries, Morphous, Pete Mancini, and others. Before I made the choice to get a sub, it was always more of a guessing game when it came to low-end. Relentless checks on cars, headphones, the consumer hi-fi, and more were required before sending out the final product.

Which led me to the question of the day: do you need a subwoofer?

After all, many great, inexpensive monitors extend to the lower frequencies. Focal, Avantone, and others have models that go down to 35 Hz and below. Headphones from Sennheiser, Audio-Technica, and Audeze easily reach down that low—some go even lower.

So what can a subwoofer get you that headphones cannot?

15 Mastering Engineers Talk about Genre, Part 2: Processing Techniques

15 Mastering Engineers Talk about Genre, Part 2: Processing Techniques:

In this three-part blog series about the role of genre in mastering, we’re exploring the question, “How much does genre determine what happens in mastering?” In Part 1 we explored deliverables and level in general. In Part 2, we get a view of whether the aesthetics of each genre can be correlated with the use of processing techniques.

Genre in Mastering with 15 Professional Mastering Engineers, Part 1

Genre in Mastering with 15 Professional Mastering Engineers, Part 1:

In this three-part blog series about the role of genre in mastering, we’re exploring the question, “How much does genre determine what happens in mastering?” In Part 1, we start by looking at deliverables and level in general. Read Part 2, Processing Techniques and Part 3, Workflows.

7 Tips for Mixing Guitars

7 Tips for Mixing Guitars:

In part one of this four-part series, we focused on the versatility of Neutron 2 for mixing vocals. In part two, we’re using Neutron as an all-in-one dynamics processing tool for guitars. In parts three and four, we’ll be going through tips on using Neutron 2 for bass and drums.

7 Tips for Mixing Bass

7 Tips for Mixing Bass:

In parts one, two, and three of this four-part series, we focused on using Neutron 2 for mixing vocals, mixing guitars, and mixing drums. Now, it’s time to bring on the bass, which can be a tricky bugger. Too much of it can swallow up the mix, but too little of it leaves a mix lacking power and warmth.

7 Tips for Mixing Drums

7 Tips for Mixing Drums:

Drums are a vital element in music. They get people moving and they provide a pulse that keeps songs alive. Well, hopefully they do. If they sound weak, the drums might do nothing more than cause disappointment and even death to your production. Don’t let that happen to you!

7 Tips for Mixing Guitars

7 Tips for Mixing Guitars:

In part one of this four-part series, we focused on the versatility of Neutron 2 for mixing vocals. In part two, we’re using Neutron as an all-in-one dynamics processing tool for guitars. In parts three and four, we’ll be going through tips on using Neutron 2 for bass and drums.

7 Tips for Mixing Vocals

7 Tips for Mixing Vocals:

If you’ve spent any time mixing, you’re already familiar with the struggle of wasting time. Maybe you’re tired of scanning your massive plug-in list when searching for different dynamics processors—compressors, limiters, gates, and more—for different tracks. Perhaps you’re annoyed by having to routinely rearrange your plug-ins on channels and you wish one plug-in could do it all. Or you may be stressed out at the thought of trying to construct an effective processing chain and need something that can do the heavy lifting for you.

In part one of this four-part series, we’ll be using Neutron 2 as an all-in-one dynamics processing tool for vocals. In parts two, three, and four, we’ll be using Neutron 2 for mixing guitars, mixing bass, and mixing drums.

Evolve Your Skills | iZotope

Evolve Your Skills | iZotope:

INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

For those who’ve been around the block, but want to gain even more knowledge, our intermediate-level series includes content focused on EQ, reference tracks, and tips for working on genres and instruments.

Evolve Your Skills | iZotope

Advanced Level

Evolve Your Skills | iZotope:

A true soundmage is never finished learning. The advanced-level series contains in-depth articles on EQ, stereo bus and submixing, compression and dynamic range, and more!

Tips for Mix Bus Processing

3 Techniques for Handling Your Stereo Bus

5 Approaches to Submixes

11 Tips to Fix Cheap Sounding Audio in the Mix

11 Tips to Fix Cheap Sounding Audio in the Mix:

I don’t know about you, but I get a lot of material made in home recording studios. And while a lot of the raw sounds coming my way are great, many recordings sport flaws that impart a palpably “cheap” sound to the material. These flaws have many root causes, such as interfaces that don’t do well for dynamic range or harmonic content; rooms that impart comb filtering to vocals; basses recorded without definition; and badly mic’d drums.

It’s my task, among others, to make these “cheap” sounds feel more “expensive”—that is, to help these mixes play nicely against their better-recorded references. They need to work in a Spotify playlist. They cannot be trounced by the competition. This is my fundamental meaning when I use terms like “cheap” and “expensive.”

The audio in my room doesn’t sound “cheap”, but sometimes I mix it that way by accident.

I want to check this one out…

3. Your snare sounds like someone flicking a piece of paper
Try a cut around 6 kHz, and a boost between 100–200 Hz to see if that adds some body. If you’re lacking impact on snare hits—if it feels a bit flat—try some compression next, emphasizing the transient with a medium attack and a medium-fast release.

You may still hear that dreaded papery noise. If so, solo the snare and see if it goes away. You may be surprised: one of the first things I look for in dealing with a papery snare is whether that sound is actually coming from the kick; often it is. In this case, attenuate that frequency in the kick track with a dynamic equalizer that’s sidechained to the snare. You can easily set this up in Neutron 2, as shown below.

Production Expert | Back To Basics. We Show You What To Have In A Remote Recording Engineer’s Gig Bag

Production Expert | Back To Basics. We Show You What To Have In A Remote Recording Engineer’s Gig Bag:

Seasoned engineers never leave home without their trusty gig bag, but if you’re new to remote recording, it can be hard to know what’s handy to have on the road. As a result, you either end up taking absolutely everything, just in case, or you end up on the job without a key cable of adaptor. In this article I am going to give you a sneak peek into my personal gig bag and explain why these items are so vital to having a successful gig.

I would add at least two dynamic mics and two attenuators. I carry an ART Dual-RDB and a pair of PylePro 58s.

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by 1 ms – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Nudge Region/Event Position Right by 1 ms

 Little timing changes are so handy to have under your fingertips. We’ve been near this command before.

Nudge Region/Event Length Left by 10 ms

Serious editing makes me keep the toolbar visible.

Move regions in the Tracks area – Logic Pro X:

Use one of the following key commands:

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by SMPTE Frame

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by SMPTE Frame

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by 1/2 SMPTE Frame

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by 1/2 SMPTE Frame

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by 5 SMPTE Frames

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by 5 SMPTE Frames

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by SMPTE Bit

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by SMPTE Bit

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by Tick

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by Tick

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by Division

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by Division

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by Beat

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by Beat

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by Bar

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by Bar

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by Nudge Value

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by Nudge Value

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by Sample

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by Sample

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by 1 ms

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by 1 ms

Nudge Region/Event Position Right by 10 ms

Nudge Region/Event Position Left by 10 ms

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND