Phantom Power And Ribbon Microphones – The Myth Busted! | Production Expert

Phantom Power And Ribbon Microphones – The Myth Busted! | Production Expert

We have all heard stories about how providing 48v phantom power to microphones that do not require it can cause damage to the mic. But if that is the case, why do some interface and console manufacturers only provide global or sectional phantom power switching? In this article, we are going to do our best to get to the bottom of the myths surrounding 48v phantom power with the help of some seriously qualified friends.

Follow the best practices to be best at what you do.

7 Tips for Getting the Most Out of One Microphone — Pro Audio Files

7 Tips for Getting the Most Out of One Microphone — Pro Audio Files

Can you imagine walking into a hardware store and asking the clerk, “which is the best tool?” I imagine a disaffected employee rolling their eyes, silently wondering when their next break is, and then distractedly telling you something like: “Screwdriver. The screwdriver is the best tool.” Then you’d go home to spend a few hours cursing that store clerk as you try, probably with very limited success, to cut a 2×4 with your new screwdriver.

5 Polar Patterns explained – easy to understand | LEWITT

5 Polar Patterns explained – easy to understand | LEWITT

It is essential to know polar patterns to get the perfect recording out of your microphone. Here you’ll learn everything you need to call yourself a pro.

Nice pictures describing coverage.

Fundamental Stereo Miking Techniques – Produce Like A Pro

Fundamental Stereo Miking Techniques – Produce Like A Pro

Stereo miking techniques use two microphones at the same time to record one sound source. Each microphone is then panned to the left and to the right to mimic the way our ears perceive sound in the “real world.” This adds width, space, and location to a recording.

1962 BBC Training Manual | Martin Mitchell’s Microphones

1962 BBC Training Manual | Martin Mitchell’s Microphones

In the 1951 BBC Microphones training manual we saw that the corporation functioned with a small selection of British manufactured microphones, most of which had been in service since the 1930’s.  So when I saw this Manual from 1962 I was curious to see how ‘Auntie’ had moved on into the swinging sixties.

The microphone layouts for orchestra and “dance bands” are outstanding.

What a neat resource.