Snare-drum Multimiking: Four Recommended Microphone Positions To Mix & Match

Mike Senior at Cambridge Music Technology.

Snare-drum Multimiking: Four Recommended Microphone Positions To Mix & Match

In this video I demonstrate the sound of four different recommended microphone positions you might use when multimiking a snare drum, showcasing the sound characteristics of each mic position with audio examples. In addition, I discuss how you might go about combining them at mixdown.

His books – “Recording Secrets for the Small Studio” and “Mixing Secrets for the Small Studio” are excellent sources of information.

Recording Secrets For The Small Studio

 

Recording Secrets For The Small Studio is an intensive training course specifically designed for small-studio enthusiasts who want a fast track to release-quality results. Based on the backroom strategies of more than 200 famous names, this thorough and down-to-earth guide leads you through a logical sequence of practical tasks to build your live-room skills progressively from the ground up. On the way, you’ll unravel the mysteries of many specialist studio tactics and gain the confidence to tackle a full range of real-world recording situations. User-friendly explanations introduce technical concepts on a strictly need-to-know basis, while chapter summaries, assignments, and extensive online resources are perfect for school and college use.

 

 Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio (2nd Edition)

 

Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio is a best-selling primer for small-studio enthusiasts who want chart-ready sonics in a hurry. Drawing on the back-room strategies of more than 160 famous names, this entertaining and down-to-earth guide leads you step-by-step through the entire mixing process. On the way, you’ll unravel the mysteries of every type of mix processing, from simple EQ and compression through to advanced spectral dynamics and ‘fairy dust’ effects. User-friendly explanations introduce technical concepts on a strictly need-to-know basis, while chapter summaries, assignments, and extensive on-line resources are perfect for school and college use.

 

7 Sidechaining Techniques Worth Checking Out | Production Expert

7 Sidechaining Techniques Worth Checking Out | Production Expert

Sidechaining was once regarded as a purely functional mixing tool, now sidechain compression has become a key weapon in the creative arsenal of producers across all genres. Here are 7 tips to help you get more from it.

The iZotope tools allow for sidechaining dynamic EQs. This is similar to using a compressor to change dynamics of a frequency band based on external levels.

Livestream Audio Workflow – In Depth How To | Production Expert

Livestream Audio Workflow – In Depth How To | Production Expert:

In this article Steven Demott describes his journey into livestreaming and gives a detailed walkthrough of the setup he’s using for high quality online streaming of music performances.

Gain Staging – Are Your Faders In Charge Of Your Mix? | Production Expert

Gain Staging – Are Your Faders In Charge Of Your Mix? | Production Expert

While perusing the Sonnox website i saw in intriguingly titled article – “Are your EQ Gain Knob and Channel Fader having an affair”?

It is always good to be reminded of the “good practice” of level matching your processors. The principal goal is to have the level of the output of a processor to be the same as the level of the input. If you bypass your processor volume shouldn’t change. If it does change you are lying to your ears.

7 Audio Rendering Tricks You Should Check Out | Production Expert

7 Audio Rendering Tricks You Should Check Out | Production Expert

Since you’re now bouncing all your drum tracks prior to mixing, you might as well go the whole hog and render everything else in your projects as audio, too. This is actually good practise for a couple of reasons beyond just taking the strain off your CPU. First, converting virtual instrument tracks to audio for mixing kills the temptation to fiddle endlessly with sounds that you should have largely settled on by that point in the production process. And second, rendering every channel dry (with faders at unity) and/or ’as mixed’ at the very end of a project creates a future-proof archive of it that you can return to for remixing years later, without worrying about plugin obsolescence or compatibility issues.

I wish I had rendered tracks with effects to save with old projects. I didn’t. Re-visiting them is hard to do since “things change”.

My current practice is to make a new “alternative” to my project and bounce all the tracks in place. This gets me tracks, buses, and stems. If I want to re-visit the mix I just open the penultimate alternative and get to work.

6 Tips for Taking the Bedroom Out of Bedroom Recordings — Pro Audio Files

6 Tips for Taking the Bedroom Out of Bedroom Recordings — Pro Audio Files

Among other things, the biggest advantages commercial studios tend to have over bedroom setups include: exciting and well-tuned live rooms (free of problematic resonances), preamps, mics, and overall signal chains that add flattering color to the performances recorded through them, a selection of amps and instruments that bring variety to the sounds used in a session and maybe most importantly, reliable monitoring.

7 Tips for Getting the Most Out of One Microphone — Pro Audio Files

7 Tips for Getting the Most Out of One Microphone — Pro Audio Files

Can you imagine walking into a hardware store and asking the clerk, “which is the best tool?” I imagine a disaffected employee rolling their eyes, silently wondering when their next break is, and then distractedly telling you something like: “Screwdriver. The screwdriver is the best tool.” Then you’d go home to spend a few hours cursing that store clerk as you try, probably with very limited success, to cut a 2×4 with your new screwdriver.

How To Move Sessions And Projects From One DAW Like Pro Tools To Another Like Studio One Or Logic Pro | Production Expert

How To Move Sessions And Projects From One DAW Like Pro Tools To Another Like Studio One Or Logic Pro | Production Expert

With more and more people using different DAWs, the need to be able to transfer a project from one DAW to another has grown. In this article we are going to show you how to move projects from one DAW, like Pro Tools, Studio and Logic Pro, to another DAW. In this article we will also cover the pitfalls in the export and import processes and how to overcome them.

Editing and Mixing 68 Socially-Distant Orchestra Members Into One Composite Performance | Production Expert

Editing and Mixing 68 Socially-Distant Orchestra Members Into One Composite Performance | Production Expert

This is why the Wisconsin Youth Symphony reached out to our studio. They wanted us to put together individual videos of each member of the orchestra so the students could have a “performance.” The students would film on their own at home, send us the files, and our team would create a composite video and mix the audio. The song? Rossini’s William Tell Overture Finale.

Stems In Music Production – Everything You Need To Know | Production Expert

Stems In Music Production – Everything You Need To Know | Production Expert

The main thing to bear in mind is that you’ll need to duplicate some resources here. On a regular mix you only need one of every effect, say reverb and one delay. But when stemming you need one of these for every stem, routed to the relevant stem bus. Otherwise, you’d have the effects of all the different stems on one stem, and the point is to separate things. So if you’re creating four stems you’ll need four sets of effects busses. You can imagine how quickly this will start to take up system resources if you’re printing a lot of stems, and especially if you’re working in 5.1 or 7.1

Simple enough to create effects tracks for each stem. Just have to remember to do it when mixing the project.

In the Logic Pro X world, if you’re using summing stacks, you might simply want to insert the effects on the stack and use the mix control knob to adjust the levels appropriately. If the recipient of the stems insists on separate effects tracks per stem, well, OK…that’s just not that hard to do.

A good practice would be to create a track for the effects bus (need to do this anyway if you want to bounce the stems) and place it right along with the summing stack in the arrange area.

Understanding the Difference Between Gain and Volume – Produce Like A Pro

Understanding the Difference Between Gain and Volume – Produce Like A Pro

Many of us have wondered if there’s a technical difference between gain and volume. The answer is “yes,” even though the terms sometimes seem to be used interchangeably. The most important distinction between gain and volume is how, or more precisely “where,” they factor into the signal path.

Gain and volume. Keys to good recordings and mixing. It’s hard to mix tracks that aren’t “printed”. If I’m trying to level/balance one track and I can’t pull down a fader on a different track (and have it stay there) then I can’t easily adjust the levels of tracks.

The 10 Most Used Chord Progressions in Pop and Rock and Roll | Thinking in Music

The 10 Most Used Chord Progressions in Pop and Rock and Roll | Thinking in Music

This text is entirely a “quote” from the above website.

Number one is the Don’t Stop Believing Progression, I – V – vi – IV (G – D – Em – C). The Axis of Awesome did a great bit about this one in which they play 40 songs in a row that all have the same progression including, No Woman No Cry, Let It Be, I’m Yours, etc… and over the past few years, that list has become a lot longer!

The second is the 50’s Progression, I – vi – IV – V (G – Em – C – D). I call it this because it was hugely popular in the 50’s and 60’s and is still used today. Notably used recently by Justin Bieber for “Baby” (Justin was like baby baby baby oh… what a pity) and Sean Kingston for “Beautiful Girls,” though Kingston really just ripped Ben E. King’s “Stand By Me” off.

The third is the Canon, I – V – vi – iii – IV – I – IV – V (G – D – Em – Bm – C – G – C – D). It was the chord progression used by Pachelbel for his Canon in D (not G as above). The piece, forgotten soon after it was written (around 1694), was rediscovered in the early 20th century and has influenced a number of songwriters. It is, however, simply an extension of the basic I – IV – V – I progression that was used by nearly every composer for hundreds of years up to about 100 years ago.

The fourth is the Blues Progression, I – I – I – I – IV – IV – I – I – V – V – I – I (G – G – G – G – C – C – G – G – D – D – G – G). This is the way Chuck Berry played it in Johnny B Goode though the last 4 chords are often V – VI – I – V (D – C – G – D). There are 12 chords because it follows the standard 12-bar blues progression. In this progression it’s common to switch freely between major and minor. This progression has been used in thousands of songs outside of the blues from Cream’s Sunshine Of Your Love to Tracy Chapman’s Give Me One Reason and beyond.

The fifth is the Smoke on the Water Progression, ii – IV – V (am – C – D). It’s usually used as part of a larger progression and was used in Purple Haze, Iron Man, House of the Rising Sun, Stepping Stone, etc…

The sixth is the Good Love Progression, I – IV – V – IV (G – C – D – C). This was used in Wild Thing, La Bamba, and Good Love, etc.

The Seventh is the Sweet Home Progression… (god, how I hate Sweet Home Alabama!) V – IV – I (D – C – G). Can’t Explain, Sweet Child of Mine.

The Eighth is a rearrangement of the Don’t Stop Believing progression vi – IV – I – V (em – C – G – D). I’m not sure what to call this one. The song that always gets stuck in my head with this one is The Red Hot Chili Pepper’s Snow, though I know Taylor Swift uses it in at least three songs (as well as most of the other progressions above…), Green Day used it in Holiday, and The Cranberries used it in Zombie, just to name a few.

The ninth is the stereotypical Descending Flamenco Progression  vi – V – IV – III (em – D – C – B (not Bm!)). This one has been used in songs from California Dreamin to Stray Cat Strut… I’m sure you can think of a few more! A variation on this is vi – V – VI – V (em – D – C – D) which arguably may be more popular today…

And the tenth that I see is the As My Guitar Gently Weeps Progression. This one straddles two keys and it’s basic representation is ii – I – V6 – bVII (- VI) (am – G – D/f# – F (- E)). It looks like a variation on the Descending Flamenco Progression and is presented with slight variations by everyone that uses it. The Beatles actually substituted an am7/G  for the G chord and left out the E. Chicago, in 25 or 6 to 4 focused on the root notes in the bass -> A – G – F# – F – E. Led Zepplin, Green Day, and Neil Young all offered their variations as well.

3 Tips for Mastering Indie Rock

‘[3 Tips for Mastering Indie Rock](https://www.izotope.com/en/learn/3-tips-for-mastering-indie-rock.html)’

3 Tips for Mastering Indie Rock

by Jett Galindo, iZotope Contributor May 28, 2020

Rock music has stood the test of time, making it one of the most enduring genres of the modern era. With today’s production tools becoming more and more advanced—and more accessible to a wider audience—one particular rock subgenre is thriving more than ever. In this article, we’ll take a look at some tips and tools for mastering indie rock and nailing the indie rock aesthetic.

The Not-So-Subtle Differences Between White, Pink, Brown And Blue Noise – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

The Not-So-Subtle Differences Between White, Pink, Brown And Blue Noise – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

I know you just read the title and thought, “I knew about white and pink noise, but what the heck is brown and blue noise?” Well, they’re a real thing and used more often than you think. But the differences between white, pink, blue and brown? It all comes down to frequency and amplitude.

Never had it explained so well. Don’t have a generator for Brown and Blue yet.

Mixing In Stereo – Everything You Need To Know To Make Your Music Mono Compatible | Production Expert

Mixing In Stereo – Everything You Need To Know To Make Your Music Mono Compatible | Production Expert

Think you know everything there is about mixing in stereo? Think again. FabFilter has published an excellent three part video series produced by Dan Worrall titled How To Mix In Stereo Without Sucking In Mono. This series is extremely well presented explaining stereo mixing fundamentals, panning, stereo microphone placement, phase, the effects of comb filtering, width, mono compatibility and more.

I just watched the first part – “Toeing the Blumlein” and stayed fascinated throughout.

I do a lot of mono monitoring to make sure things don’t get lost, but I rarely make changes that will make the mono mix down work really well. These videos are an excellent pointer.

Using Logic built-in plug-ins I think it will require several steps (made easy by the FabFilter tools)

Bus effects – independent panning required?

Logic EQ would need to have two instances, one for Mid and one for Side. Probably 2 aux channels…no, simply use the EQ in “Dual Mono” mode and work with Mid and Side channels as desired. Unfortunately there are no documentation resources for the “Dual Mono” mode of the EQs in Logic. The documentation says use two plug-ins. I will try to compare other EQs and see how easily things can be adapted.

Ozone 9 EQ essentially has both available “easily” along with pan and width. 

Mid, Side, and Everything In Between (A Mid/Side Deep Dive)

Mid/side processing is an undeniably powerful technique, and one which gives the mastering engineer a wide range of sonic sculpting tools not available with traditional stereo processing. However, as we all learned from Spiderman’s Uncle Ben, “with great power comes great responsibility.”

 IK Multimedia has a nifty new EQ – T-Racks EQual…

IK Multimedia – EQual

The new EQual digital equalizer is a 10-band, ultra-clear, high-end parametric equalizer with an extremely transparent sound, ultra-precise editing and a vast array of filter shapes that are based on the typical curves of classic British and American analog EQ’s. This incredibly flexible “hybrid monster” gives you the best of both worlds – digital precision with transparent clarity and on-demand analog character that works perfectly for high end mastering as well as individual track work.

 

 Also need to look at the Imagers….