Apply Quantization Permanently ⌃Q – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Apply Quantization Permanently    ⌃Q

 MIDI quantization. The holy grail and the pit of tar. When properly used we can get accurate scores and more realistic “performances”.

The Region inspector allows for changing quantization non-destructively. The changes made here do not alter the events permanently, much like changing the gain of an audio region.

MIDI region parameters – Logic Pro X:

Apply MIDI region parameters permanently
You can apply the MIDI region parameter settings of all selected MIDI regions and folders with the Functions > MIDI Region Parameters > Apply All Parameters Permanently command.

This means that all settings are actually written as data, and playback parameters revert to normal values. The audible result remains the same. The Loop parameter and advanced quantization parameters (Q-Velocity, Q-Length, Q-Flam, Q-Range, and Q-Strength) are not affected. However, use this carefully as you lose the ability change your mind about MIDI region edits.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

I fondly recall the fine control of MIDI from Opcode Vision and Studio Vision. Emagic Notator (then Logic) showed up on the scene right around the time of my full commitment to Opcode software and tools. When Gibson bought Opcode I thought the Mac was doomed as the computer for musicians.

My memory could be faulty, but I’m pretty sure Dave Oppenheim from Opcode got hired by Apple in the late 1990s. The whole Core Audio and Core MIDI worlds inside macOS and iOS are so much like OMS.

Settings: MIDI Meaning ⌃⌥⇧M – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Settings: MIDI Meaning    ⌃⌥⇧M
 

Score Editing. The note included in the documentation is probably the best bit of advice. Why it is located at the end of the section is beyond me. Important tips on usage should be placed at the first likely point of contact – the lead paragraph of the section. The command is in the ‘Layout’ menu in the Score Editor window.

MIDI Meaning settings – Logic Pro X:

Important: If you do use MIDI Meaning, you need to adjust the settings before you begin to insert accents and so on. This is because the settings have no influence on accents and phrasing marks that have already been inserted.

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Template Changes – multi-bus

I should document changes to my most used template – multi-bus – I am beginning to keep comments in the Project notes.

2019-01-06
Removed tracks for all of the AUX except MixBus. Tracks get added automation is used on an AUX.

Rename output channels properly

Fix mixer windows in screenset 3 for audio.
Fix mixer windows in screenset 4 for MIDI

2018-12-22
Headphone and monitor mixes added (HP1/2)
stock plugins (O8 and Insight2

Screenset 1 is overview with notes, tracks, mixer.

Screenset 2 is Tracks (Arrange window)

Screenset 3 is Mixer (sized for typical audio) and transport

Screenset 4 is Mixer (sized for MIDI instruments with settings)

Hunting the Logic Pro X ‘Environment’

@StudioIntern1 #LogicProX

Today’s ‘command’ was “MIDI Environment”. I know so little. I have the chapter in the Logic Pro X User Manual.

“Environment overview
The Environment refers to the virtual environment of Logic Pro inside your computer. It provides a virtual view of your MIDI studio, giving you complete control over your MIDI setup, and includes the following objects.”

Excerpt From: Apple Inc. “Logic Pro X User Guide.” iBooks. 

Off hunting for resources out there in the internet.

Logic Pro X – Route MIDI to Multiple Instruments with MIDI Environment

Logic and The Environment, Part 1: The Simple Truths

Logic and The Environment, Part 2: The Clicks and Ports Layer

Top 5 Reasons NOT to be Afraid of Logic’s Environment

Lots more to review and read.

MIDI file scale generator

I’m a bit old-fashioned. I wrote a “scale” generator way back when so I could play a MIDI file of a Major/minor scale sequence.

These days I use “MIDIplayer X” to play my scales. The classic ‘t2mf’ is used to create the MIDI file from a shell script…

 

 
#!/bin/bash
# SCALE="C" SCALEM="a" N1=60

let N1=N1+0
let N2=N1+2
let N3=N1+4
let N4=N1+5
let N5=N1+7
let N6=N1+9
let N7=N1+11
let N8=N1+12

let NM1=N1-3
let NM2=N1-1

cat >$SCALE-$SCALEM.txt <<EOF
MFile 0 1 24
MTrk
0 Meta Text "$SCALE major scale"
0 On ch=1 n=$N1 v=64
12 On ch=1 n=$N1 v=0
24 On ch=1 n=$N2 v=64
36 On ch=1 n=$N2 v=0
48 On ch=1 n=$N3 v=64
60 On ch=1 n=$N3 v=0
72 On ch=1 n=$N4 v=64
84 On ch=1 n=$N4 v=0
96 On ch=1 n=$N5 v=64
108 On ch=1 n=$N5 v=0
120 On ch=1 n=$N6 v=64
132 On ch=1 n=$N6 v=0
144 On ch=1 n=$N7 v=64
156 On ch=1 n=$N7 v=0
168 On ch=1 n=$N8 v=64
180 On ch=1 n=$N8 v=0
190 Meta Text "$SCALEM minor scale"
200 On ch=1 n=$NM1 v=64
212 On ch=1 n=$NM1 v=0
224 On ch=1 n=$NM2 v=64
236 On ch=1 n=$NM2 v=0
248 On ch=1 n=$N1 v=64
260 On ch=1 n=$N1 v=0
272 On ch=1 n=$N2 v=64
284 On ch=1 n=$N2 v=0
296 On ch=1 n=$N3 v=64
308 On ch=1 n=$N3 v=0
320 On ch=1 n=$N4 v=64
332 On ch=1 n=$N4 v=0
344 On ch=1 n=$N5 v=64
356 On ch=1 n=$N5 v=0
368 On ch=1 n=$N6 v=64
380 On ch=1 n=$N6 v=0
392 Meta TrkEnd
TrkEnd
EOF

t2mf $SCALE-$SCALEM.txt >$SCALE-$SCALEM.mid

I assure you that weird characters in file names can be odd.

 

The VIrtual Orchestra: String Basics – KeyboardMag

The VIrtual Orchestra: String Basics – KeyboardMag:

Many film and TV scores live or die on how well the strings are conjured. Fortunately, the state of the art of sampled string libraries is finally approaching a level of illusion that can convince all but the most refined ears. As much as we’d all love to play a keyboard and sound like a symphony orchestra, it almost always takes the patient construction of multiple tracks and an understanding of real orchestration to create authentic string passages.

I need to translate into Miroslav Philharmonik 2 or Logic’s “Studio Strings”.

A good morning (or two) exercise.

Arranging Sampled Strings – KeyboardMag

Arranging Sampled Strings – KeyboardMag:

“Use separate patches for each instrument, as this fights playing strings like an organ and forces you to think of all of the parts separately, as an arranger working with real string players would.”

I’m so glad I went to Feedly to find MusicTech feed today. In the list of similar was Keyboard Magazine. It’s not just about playing keyboards and pianos, it’s about using keyboards.

I’m always on the lookout for arranging tips for “virtual” ensembles, including how to size and “sound” the groups of instruments.

Handy hints. Examples in score!!!!

Show/Hide MIDI Effects – Logic Pro X Keyboard Command of the Day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX

No preset keyboard command.

Located using the “Edit Keyboard Commands” (option-K)

Hovering over the command in the list Logic offers further information “also available as menu item ‘MIDI Effects’ in a local menu”.

The local menu referenced is the Channel Strip contextual menu (pop-up). When a MIDI channel is selected in the mixer, either external or instrument, the control-click on the channel strip reveals the “MIDI Effects” entry. When checked the MIDI effects appear in the channel strip between the EQ thumbnail and the Input selector. For external MIDI tracks there is just a blank space, no effects can be added. For instruments you can add MIDI effects.

You can create your own MIDI effects by adding a “Scripter” effect.

/*
With Scripter, you can use JavaScript to create your own custom MIDI processing
effects, including slider controls for real-time interaction.

For detailed information about using Scripter, including code samples,
see the MIDI plug-ins chapter of the Logic Pro X Effects or
MainStage 3 Effects manual.
*/

// example: simple pass through and MIDI monitor

function HandleMIDI(event)
{
event.trace();
event.send();
}

Latest online help is for version 10.3 – Logic Pro X Effects – Scripter plug-in

MIDI Out Toggle (option-O) – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX

Very little documentation about this one (and the counterpart MIDI In Toggle – option-I)

Wound up opening the Event List to see if anything happened when I toggled. Yes!

At the top right of the Event List are 2 buttons that look like MIDI DIN plugs – one with an “in” indicator, one with an “out” indicator. Toggling MIDI In and Out changes the state of these buttons.

From the glossary of the Logic Pro X User Manual.

“MIDI In button
The button used to turn on Step Input mode in the editors. See alsoStep Input function.”

Excerpt From: Apple Inc. “Logic Pro X User Guide.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/logic-pro-x-user-guide/id960809726?mt=11

Unfortunately there is no MIDI Out button description there. The roll-over help is informative, hard to get it to stand still so it can be copied.

MIDI Out Button (option-O)

Play MIDI events when they’re clicked, selected, or added.

MIDI In button (option-I)

Add notes without recording in real time — using your MIDI keyboard, for example

There are some very deep technical things that talk about using SYSEX faders in the environment to do extreme control of MIDI devices. Not ready to dive in there yet. The environment could provide a solution for resetting all of the lights on my X-Touch controller.

Forgot the MIDI In side of things…

MIDI In button

How to Make Your MIDI Sound Less like MIDI — Pro Audio Files

How to Make Your MIDI Sound Less like MIDI — Pro Audio Files

While virtual instruments and sample libraries have come a long way since the early 1980’s, you might find that the musical ideas that you create using MIDI still sound like, well … MIDI. The dynamics, tone and overall feel of music produced using MIDI tends to be lacking in comparison to music created using more traditional means. Here are some tips if you want to make your music sound less like it was created using a digital protocol, and more like an organic, expressive musical performance.

Always good to know how to help the “cheesy” sounds that MIDI instruments sometimes produce. New things in Logic Pro X allow for articulation to help. Miroslav Philharmonik has some decent articulations as well. Music has to breathe at a natural pace.

The latest MIDI specification includes Polyphonic Expression – new things happen! This should help. Like listening to a Disklavier that uses the “extra” performance information.

 

How to Make Your MIDI Sound Less like MIDI — Pro Audio Files

How to Make Your MIDI Sound Less like MIDI — Pro Audio Files

While virtual instruments and sample libraries have come a long way since the early 1980’s, you might find that the musical ideas that you create using MIDI still sound like, well … MIDI. The dynamics, tone and overall feel of music produced using MIDI tends to be lacking in comparison to music created using more traditional means. Here are some tips if you want to make your music sound less like it was created using a digital protocol, and more like an organic, expressive musical performance.

Always good to know how to help the “cheesy” sounds that MIDI instruments sometimes produce. New things in Logic Pro X allow for articulation to help. Miroslav Philharmonik has some decent articulations as well. Music has to breathe at a natural pace.

The latest MIDI specification includes Polyphonic Expression – new things happen! This should help. Like listening to a Disklavier that uses the “extra” performance information.

 

The MIDI 1.0 Specification

The MIDI 1.0 Specification

The newly adopted MIDI Polyphonic Expression (MPE) specification is available for download at the bottom of the Complete MIDI 1.0 Detailed Specification page

Polyphonic Expression. Right up there with Polyphonic Aftertouch – a rare beast indeed.