10 Mai Tai Percussion Presets – Presonus Blog

10 Mai Tai Percussion Presets

We’re still in September, it’s still Studio One’s 10th anniversary, and so once again the Friday Tip is 10 Tips! This week, the accent is on percussion—which is an essential part of any decent mix. We’re going to get down and dirty in percussion-land, so load the Mai Tai synthesizer, and let’s get started.

The post 10 Mai Tai Percussion Presets appeared first on PreSonus Blog.

The Bigness of Huge Drum Sound – PreSonus Blog

The Bigness of Huge Drum Sound – PreSonus Blog

So…you want some huge drum sounds? Here you go. This is super well-suited to hip-hop and EDM, but can also give a monster drum sound for rock. The star of this show is the Softube Saturation Knob and FX Chain Splitter.

Friday Tips: Studio One’s Secret Equalizer – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: Studio One’s Secret Equalizer – PreSonus Blog

Pop quiz: How many EQ plug-ins ship with Studio One Pro?

If you answered seven, congratulations! Then you know about the Pro EQ, the three different Fat Channel EQs, Ampire’s Graphic Equalizer, the Channel Strip, and using the Multiband Dynamics as a really hip graphic EQ. But actually, the correct answer is eight.

Friday Tips: The Air Machine – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Air Machine – PreSonus Blog:

Boosting the highs a bit is a time-honored mixing and mastering technique. You don’t want to overdo it, but a little brightness can give a song a lift, increase vocal intelligibility, articulate instruments better, and add some welcome “ear candy.” If you look at the spectral energy of a lot of hit records going back decades, you’ll often find a few extra dB of boost in the 7 to 10 kHz range, to add some “air” and sweetness.

So just boost the EQ a little bit, right? Well, that’s one option…but we can do better. The Air Machine FX Chain (Fig. 1) is equally at home on individual tracks in the Song page (try it judiciously on drums, drum room mics, acoustic guitar, piano, vocals, etc.), or on finished mixes in the Project page. And yes, there’s a download at the end so you don’t even have to create this yourself.

The download for the preset works.

Studio One 4 Pattern Editing | Sound on Sound

Studio One 4 Pattern Editing |:

Studio One 4 introduced pattern-based step sequencing as an alternative mode to the familiar piano-roll MIDI editor. It’s one of those features that makes you wonder why every DAW doesn’t already have it. It’s simple and intuitive in a way that’s reminiscent of the creative tools we’ve come to enjoy in hardware. Pattern-based sequencing is most often used for drums, but as we’ll see in this month’s workshop, the Pattern Sequencer in Studio One can be just as easily directed to synthesizer and instrument sounds, and can very quickly generate something unexpected.

I suspect this won’t work for folks who don’t subscribe to SOS. The link should work properly in about 6 months. It works for me today 😉

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

When you play an acoustic guitar harder, it not only gets louder, but brighter. Dry, electric guitar doesn’t have that quality…by comparison, the electrified sound by itself is somewhat lifeless. But I’m not here to be negative! Let’s look at a solution that can give your dry electric guitar some more acoustic-like qualities.

I will investigate how to do this in Logic Pro X.

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

When you play an acoustic guitar harder, it not only gets louder, but brighter. Dry, electric guitar doesn’t have that quality…by comparison, the electrified sound by itself is somewhat lifeless. But I’m not here to be negative! Let’s look at a solution that can give your dry electric guitar some more acoustic-like qualities.

I will investigate how to do this in Logic Pro X.

Friday Tips: The Limiter—Demystified – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Limiter—Demystified – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

Conventional wisdom says that compared to compression, limiting is a less sophisticated type of dynamics control whose main use is to restrict dynamic range to prevent issues like overloading of subsequent stages. However, I sometimes prefer limiting with particular signal sources.

Pumping Drums—With No Sidechain! – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: Pumping Drums—With No Sidechain! – PreSonus Blog:

The “pumping” effect is a cool EDM staple that also works with other intense forms of music. One of the best-known examples is Eric Prydz’s seminal EDM track from 2004, “Call on Me.” Usually, this technique requires sidechaining, but with the PreSonus Compressor sidechain filter, we’re covered. The effect works best if there are some sustaining sounds with which it can work—like cymbals for drum parts, or pads if you want to pump a non-drum track.

I need to see if I can do the same thing in Logic Pro X. Just because.

Frequency-Selective Guitar Compression – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: Frequency-Selective Guitar Compression – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

Some instruments, when compressed, lack “sparkle” if the stronger, lower frequencies compress high frequencies as well as lower ones. This is a common problem with guitar, but there’s a solution: the Compressor’s internal sidechain can apply compression to only the guitar’s lower frequencies, while leaving the higher frequencies uncompressed so they “ring out” above the compressed sound. (Multiband compression works for this too, but sidechaining can be a faster and easier way to accomplish the same results.)

This handy hint should work similarly in Logic Pro X. I will have to try.

Is Innovation Dying In DAW Development?

Is Innovation Dying In DAW Development?

Over the years there have been a growing number of Pro Tools users who have felt at some point that Pro Tools has been playing a long game of catch up when it comes to introducing “new” features. When I refer to “new” I mean features that are new to Pro Tools, not innovative new features that haven’t been seen before in other DAWs.

I read a number of blogs as a daily exercise. ProTools Expert is one of them, even though I abandoned ProTools at version 8 (Got Logic Pro X) and never looked back.

I use Studio One (now version 4), Harrison MixBus, and Logic Pro X (with the occasional GarageBand for good measure). I find that I learn *A LOT* about DAWs and recording and mixing when I try to find the similarity between them along with how to do “the same thing”.

I think there’s plenty of innovation left – Cubase, FL Studio, Sonar, LIVE!

It’s all good.