Compressor – Neutron 2 Help Documentation

Compressor – Neutron 2 Help Documentation:

Simply put, a compressor adjusts dynamic range. Most commonly, it reduces it using downward compression, but as you’ll discover, Neutron is capable of both upwards and downwards compression.

This is the current documentation for the N2 Compressor.

@iZotope

MV2 Compressor Plugin | Waves

MV2 Compressor Plugin | Waves:

With high and low level compression controlled by a streamlined interface, the MV2 is the simplest, most flexible way to control your sound. With intuitive dual faders for quick dynamic optimization, it’s never been easier to maximize your volume

Equal time for Waves MV2. The catalyst to my “upward compression” search.

Compression – Expansion – and those other things

Today I want to dig in to compression and expansion. I understand compression. I am starting to understand expansion. I really don’t understand the difference between “downward compression” (the typical) and “upward compression” (not so typical).

Waves has a plugin – MV2 – that combines an upward compressor and a downward compressor. Warren Huart (Produce Like A Pro Academy) thinks highly of it.

I am confident that the iZotope Neutron 2 processor can function similarly to the MV2. There are 2 compressors, both of which can do downward compression (positive ratios) and upward compression (negative ratios).

Set Compressor 1 to the negative ratio and “upward” threshold, set Compressor 2 to the positive ration and “downward” threshold. Use the output gain control to adjust.

Now we get to try it in practice.

Expanding on Compression: 3 Overlooked Techniques for Improving Dynamic Range

Expanding on Compression: 3 Overlooked Techniques for Improving Dynamic Range:

“When many engineers say ‘compression’, what they mean is “downward compression.” In other words, bringing down the level of the signal above the threshold that you set on your compressor, to make louder things quieter. But all too often, we forget about upward compression, where quieter sounds are brought up to the threshold point; this technique can be quite handy in certain situations for a more transparent effect (it can also be approximated with parallel compression, if you don’t have an upward-compressor on hand).

Reference pointer for my Compression post coming up.