Are We Being Conned By Mixing Tricks? We Look At The Most Popular Ones | Production Expert

Are We Being Conned By Mixing Tricks? We Look At The Most Popular Ones | Production Expert

Some people refer to “mixing tricks” but are they really tricks? When is a technique just a technique? Julian looks at some common examples and decides.

I put an EQ as the first insert on my reverb AUX channels. When I insert reverbs I try to make sure that I adjust the filters that are built in to most of my reverbs. I think it’s better to be able to “see” the filter on the AUX channels.

Get Great Reverb Tips From Top Producers And Engineers | Production Expert

Get Great Reverb Tips From Top Producers And Engineers | Production Expert

Dom Morley – Vocal Reverb Tip
My number one reverb tip on vocals is if you want to keep the vocal sort of present and close to you, but you want a big reverb on it. Your biggest problem is when you put a big reverb on it, the vocal disappears back into the room.

If you still want the vocal close, put a pre- delay on that reverb.

The pre- delay makes the room still sound big, but makes the artist, the singer or the guitarist, whatever you want upfront, it makes that stay up front. And it just sounds like the room behind them has got bigger rather than they’ve been lost into it.

How To Create A Reverb That Narrows To Mono As It Decays – Tutorial | Production Expert

How To Create A Reverb That Narrows To Mono As It Decays – Tutorial | Production Expert

In this article, Ufuk Onen shows how to create an effects trick that begins as a wide reverb, then gradually narrows and eventually turns into mono as it fades away.

This sounds pretty neat – like he says, not for everything, but certainly makes for some nice effect.

Confused By Reverb? This Might be The Plug-in You Need | Production Expert

Confused By Reverb? This Might be The Plug-in You Need | Production Expert

If you haven’t checked out FabFilter’s Pro-R reverb you absolutely should because reverb presents some specific challenges to the UI designer. Reverb is complicated. it’s a fact, and broadly speaking there have been two common ways to address this in a UI. Either present just a few controls and let the user dial in a room, hall or whatever, adjust decay time and an HF damping and get on with it (i.e. present simplicity at the expense of control), or present a comprehensive set of parameters and scare off some of the users.

The FabFilter “Beginner’s Guide to Reverb” should be required homework before using any reverb. Most of the controls are available in lots of ‘verbs’ – but the Pro-R interface is sooooo pretty.

The presentation really presses home the points of how the pieces really work…

6 Tips for Taking the Bedroom Out of Bedroom Recordings — Pro Audio Files

6 Tips for Taking the Bedroom Out of Bedroom Recordings — Pro Audio Files

Among other things, the biggest advantages commercial studios tend to have over bedroom setups include: exciting and well-tuned live rooms (free of problematic resonances), preamps, mics, and overall signal chains that add flattering color to the performances recorded through them, a selection of amps and instruments that bring variety to the sounds used in a session and maybe most importantly, reliable monitoring.

Exploring the Neoverb Advanced Panel

Exploring the Neoverb Advanced Panel

by Griffin Brown, iZotope Content Team October 14, 2020

But what if you’re a mild-to-severe control freak (like I am) when it comes to your audio? You might want to dive a bit deeper than the visible tools allow. Thankfully, Neoverb not only lets you do so, but even offers some reverb-warping options you won’t find in many other reverb plug-ins.

I find the screen captures from Insight showing how the sound changes with the reverb settings highly useful. I can hear the differences, but having a different perspective makes it sink in just a little better…

3 Tips to Learn Neoverb in 10 Minutes

3 Tips to Learn Neoverb in 10 Minutes

Now, iZotope has taken Exponential Audio’s killer algorithmic reverbs and brought them into the music space with Neoverb, a reverberation plug-in as handy as it is smart, which makes use of the AI-powered tools iZotope is famous for.

Neoverb sports a lot of intelligent and helpful features that make it intuitive and easy to use. It also happens to sound pretty damn great. So, we thought a tutorial was in order: read on for three tips to get yourself up and running with Neoverb in under ten minutes.

Included in the Music Production Suite 4 bundle. Of course I upgraded…

How to create ambient shimmer pads in Logic Pro X – MusicTech

How to create ambient shimmer pads in Logic Pro X – MusicTech

An intriguing way of routing audio plug-ins can unlock a world of ambient ‘shimmer’ pad effects that’s quite unlike traditional sound creation methods.
Mark Cousins

Q. When should I use mono reverb as opposed to stereo reverb?

Q. When should I use mono reverb as opposed to stereo reverb?

Another nifty trick for chart-targeted pop and EDM productions is to widen a reverb effect until it gives that ‘outside the speakers’ illusion, and then use just a small amount of it to expand the apparent width of your mix as a whole. Although such a reverb will have such dreadful mono-compatibility that it may pretty much vanish in mono, that’s rarely a great loss in practice, because the reverb serves no musical function. Better to lose some reverb in mono, than an important musical line!

Mike Senior, “Sound on Sound”

How To Use Reverb and Delay in Series for a Spacious Vocal Sound – Audio Issues : Audio Issues

How To Use Reverb and Delay in Series for a Spacious Vocal Sound – Audio Issues : Audio Issues

So I added the delay plug-in after the reverb to add the effect. But that made the reverb too delay-y, so I turned the wet/dry signal to 50/50.

That way some of the reverb came through unaffected to add normal space, while some of the reverb was delayed to add a subtle echo effect.

After adding an EQ to filter out the highs and the lows, the vocal space sat nicely with the rest of the mix.

Thanks to Björgvin Benediktsson for the tip…

9 Tips for Using Reverb with Drums

9 Tips for Using Reverb with Drums

by Nick Messitte, iZotope Contributor August 20, 2019

Some of the reverbs we’ll be working with today
Your drums sound narrow, dry, and small. You need them to sound bigger, so you send them to a concert-hall reverb. That’ll do the trick, right? Probably not. Now all you have are small, narrow drums surrounded by a lot of incongruous reverb.

Use Reverb Like A Pro: Part 2 | Sound on Sound

Use Reverb Like A Pro: Part 2 |:

Following last month’s introduction to reverb , we take you through the tips and tricks of some of the world’s best producers — many of whom are thinking about the reverb sound they want long before they get to the mix.

Part 2 – no need to keep the entire work hidden…

Use Reverb Like A Pro: 1 | Sound on Sound

Use Reverb Like A Pro: 1 |:

If you’ve ever spent hours mixing only to be confronted with a wall of mud, you might need to think harder about how to use reverb and delay in your mixes – and some simple tricks can yield dramatic results.

Mike Senior has been providing useful information and ideas for a long time. I own copies of his books. I now add some links to his online resources.

Q. What do reverb preset names actually mean? |

Q. What do reverb preset names actually mean? |:

SOS contributor Mike Senior replies: Well, the names of presets are only useful if they give you an idea of what to expect sonically, and that’s a bit hit-and-miss in my experience. I’m most sceptical about preset names with instrument suggestions in them, particularly if that’s unqualified by any further information. Reverb use depends so much on the stylistic expectations and the nature of the recordings themselves (particularly what kind of spill, if any, is baked into the recordings), so a simple ‘Snare’ preset would rarely be of interest to me in practice. On the other hand, ‘Epic Snare Boosh’, ‘Tight Snare Ambience’, or ‘Icy Rimshot Tail’ might well entice my mouse click under appropriate circumstances. It’s also quite common for a preset that’s ostensibly named for one use to work very well for something completely different, or to provide a great base for editing into another form. So, in short, take those kinds of preset names with a huge pinch of salt!

8 Creative Reverb Effects for Sound Design

8 Creative Reverb Effects for Sound Design:

The purpose of reverb is to create a sense of ambiance, foster a feeling of depth, or take listeners to new locales. But today we depart from these more prosaic usages to focus on something a little more creative—namely, how to use reverb as a tool for sound design.