Set main finger 5 ⌃⌥⇧5 – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Set main finger 5    ⌃⌥⇧5

 Score Editor.

I can’t seem to find any reading material that addresses “main finger”. Will have to confer with my scoring wizard (who happens to be a guitar player).

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Settings: MIDI Meaning ⌃⌥⇧M – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Settings: MIDI Meaning    ⌃⌥⇧M
 

Score Editing. The note included in the documentation is probably the best bit of advice. Why it is located at the end of the section is beyond me. Important tips on usage should be placed at the first likely point of contact – the lead paragraph of the section. The command is in the ‘Layout’ menu in the Score Editor window.

MIDI Meaning settings – Logic Pro X:

Important: If you do use MIDI Meaning, you need to adjust the settings before you begin to insert accents and so on. This is because the settings have no influence on accents and phrasing marks that have already been inserted.

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Settings: Guitar Tablature ⌃⌥⇧G – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Settings: Guitar Tablature ⌃⌥⇧G
 

This one is kind of hard to find. The “Settings:” is attached to a number of entries which look like they belong in the Score Editor. The key commands window indicates that the commands are available in a local menu (never telling us which).

The commands are found in the “Layout” menu in the Score Editor. Choosing the entry opens the “Project Settings” window with the appropriate “tab” selected.

Tablature settings – Logic Pro X:

Tablature is a method of notating music for fretted string instruments—especially for guitar and electric bass—but also for other fretted instruments. In this system, the horizontal lines represent the strings of the instrument. Notes are always written on the line/string at which they are played. The fret numbers are shown instead of regular note heads. Logic Pro automatically converts notes into tablature, if a staff style containing a Clef parameter set to one of these tuning sets is used. The exact characteristics of these tuning sets are determined in the Tablature pane.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Print ⌘P – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Print    ⌘P
 

Obvious command in a Mac application. I wonder where it is available?

Have to have s Score Editor of some sort open for printing to actually work. Project notes and track notes can be printed out as well.

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Next Staff ↓ – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Next Staff    ↓
 

Welcome to the Score Editor. I haven’t written music notation for at least 15 years. Back when I was doing serious music 😉 I used Finale. The “Orchestra Nova” experience would have been so much more entertaining using modern day Logic Pro X as opposed to Finale and Opcode Studio Vision. Light years. Parsecs even.

 

Notation overview – Logic Pro X:

Notation overview

You can view MIDI regions in software instrument (and external MIDI instrument) tracks as music notation in the Score Editor. Notes and other musical events are displayed as standard notation, along with common symbols such as time and key signature, bar lines, and clef signs. You can add and edit notes, add sustain pedal markings and other symbols, and print the score.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

The VIrtual Orchestra: String Basics – KeyboardMag

The VIrtual Orchestra: String Basics – KeyboardMag:

Many film and TV scores live or die on how well the strings are conjured. Fortunately, the state of the art of sampled string libraries is finally approaching a level of illusion that can convince all but the most refined ears. As much as we’d all love to play a keyboard and sound like a symphony orchestra, it almost always takes the patient construction of multiple tracks and an understanding of real orchestration to create authentic string passages.

I need to translate into Miroslav Philharmonik 2 or Logic’s “Studio Strings”.

A good morning (or two) exercise.