5 Ways to Use Dynamic EQ with Sidechain

5 Ways to Use Dynamic EQ with Sidechain:

Set internal (or external) triggers on drums
Mixing drums is one of the bigger challenges in a song because we expect them to be many things at once: loud, groovy, punchy, cohesive, clear, etc. Compression and transient shaping are a big help here, but dynamic EQ proves useful when carving a unique space for each drum hit. For example:

If the overhead mics picked up too much snare bite and this conflicts with the close-miked snare sound, use the main snare to trigger a momentary cut in level in the overheads whenever it’s played.

Is your snare struggling to shine because of masking with the hi-hats? Place one node on the snare harmonics and another on the lower end of the hi-hats, then set the sidechain to duck the hi-hats when the snare is present.

Unpitched percussion with considerable low end can conflict with the lower frequencies of a kick drum. To keep that pulse but prevent sloppy collisions from occurring, get your dynamic EQ sidechain to high-pass the bassy parts of the perc only when the kick comes down.

I need to check to see if each node in the Neutron 2 EQ can have a separate side chain. The side chain choices are internal – all the bands –  and external (the one set in Logic as side chain). It looks like I can only side chain one external track.

I can do something like side chain the overheads from Logic and set the nodes in N2 to side chain from the different bands…that will have to do.

Also see “7 Tips for Mixing Drums”

How to Use Dynamic EQ in Mastering

How to Use Dynamic EQ in Mastering:

A dynamic EQ is a powerful tool that combines the precision of an equalizer with the musical ballistics of a compressor.

I have dynamic EQs – a couple of different ones. I find that I don’t add compression to tracks in a lot of situations.

6 Ways to Use a Low Pass Filter When Mixing

6 Ways to Use a Low Pass Filter When Mixing:

Used with intention, low pass filters can steer wild arrangements toward more polished results and transform one-dimensional sounds into deeper, darker versions. But employed haphazardly, they have the potential to suck the brightness out of a mix and muddy otherwise pleasant audio. Considering this, we put together the following guide: six ways to use a low pass filter when mixing.

6 Ways to Use a High Pass Filter When Mixing

6 Ways to Use a High Pass Filter When Mixing:

A high-pass filter is a simple, but effective EQ curve that scoops out unwanted low frequencies from an audio source. Like most engineers, I use them at many points in my mixes to clean up woofy signals and tighten up arrangements.

The Reason Why You Can’t Hear Your Bass On Small Speakers

The Reason Why You Can’t Hear Your Bass On Small Speakers – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog:

Most of the time the problem comes from misunderstanding exactly what frequencies affect the bass instrument. Too many times we think that it’s the frequencies below 100Hz (especially 60Hz) that provide the bass we need. While it’s quite true that those frequencies are important for what we might call the girth of the sound, they won’t reproduce well on small speakers, and that’s where the problem lies. In other words, EQing too low.

Below 100Hz Girth

120Hz to 200Hz Bottom

250Hz to 320Hz Low-end definition

700Hz Body

1kHz to 1.5kHz High-end definition

2.5kHz to 3kHz String noise/buzz

EQ Cheat Sheet: Simple Guidelines for Effective Equalization – Produce Like A Pro

EQ Cheat Sheet: Simple Guidelines for Effective Equalization – Produce Like A Pro:

Understanding equalization–probably the most widely used signal processor available to engineers–is essential to making records sound their absolute best. Sometimes it’s as simple as high-passing an instrument in the proper spot, while other cases require a bit more attention and precision. Either way, EQ is fundamental to making mix elements sound more or less defined, larger or smaller, or “better” versus “different.” Having a general reference like an EQ cheat sheet will help get you where you want to go more quickly.

In response to a request at the Produce Like a Pro Academy I went hunting for some easy to access cheatsheets. This is one of a few.

The Ultimate EQ Cheat Sheet for Every Common Instrument

The Ultimate EQ Cheat Sheet for Every Common Instrument:

A subtractive approach to EQ

Not everyone’s ethos on EQ is the same, and most people may never see eye to eye on EQ approach. That being said, I come from the camp that subtractive over additive tends to be better for your mix in most cases. Now, I’m not saying to live in a strictly subtractive world; I do make boosts from time to time when needed or appropriate, but it’s probably a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio of cuts to boosts.

The question was asked in the Produce Like a Pro Academy. Here is one idea of a “standard” EQ cheatsheet.

Pulse Techniques EQP-1A | Sound on Sound

Pulse Techniques EQP-1A |:

As a standard facility of most mixing consoles and DAWs, we all tend to take EQ for granted, even though there are many different types of equaliser with varying levels of sophistication and application. While the true origins of the first audio equaliser are shrouded in the mists of time, two names stand out for me as pioneers of audio equalisation: Peter Baxandall from the UK, and the American, Eugene Shenk. Baxandall was an electronics engineer (and friend of our esteemed Editor In Chief) who came up with a very elegant circuit for an active bass and treble equaliser. He published his design, royalty-free, in 1952 and it has subsequently been employed almost universally in mixing consoles and hi-fi amplifiers, bearing his name as the Baxandall equaliser or ‘tone control’. Amazingly, at around the same time in America, Gene Shenk developed a passive design which has become the legendary studio equaliser — the PulTec EQP-1.

The Pultec is fabled. I use my emulation all the time. This review is an excellent guide to what it is and why it works.