How to Ace the “Static Mix”: Get Levels & Panning Right the 1st Time — SonicScoop

How to Ace the “Static Mix”: Get Levels & Panning Right the 1st Time — SonicScoop:

In this article, I’m going to show you how to nail the most important step in mixing. If you want high-quality mixes, getting the volume balance right (also known as the “static mix”) is crucial.

Why Do My Mixes Sound Bad? 8 Tips to Douse the Flames

Why Do My Mixes Sound Bad? 8 Tips to Douse the Flames:

First, make sure something isn’t actually amiss with your gear. Many are the times where it hasn’t actually been my ears. With a panoply of hardware pieces and software abounding, it’s easy to see where something might mangle the proceedings in the chain.

Let me hear…route the audio through T-Racks One, Sonarworks, Ozone 8, and out through Sonarworks. Where did all that sub-50 information come from 😉

5 Ways Inter-plugin Communication Streamlines Audio Mixing

5 Ways Inter-plugin Communication Streamlines Audio Mixing:

Inter-plugin communication is a technology developed here at iZotope that allows our plug-ins to interact and share invaluable information with one another across a session, helping you produce, mix, and master with better results.

Not only does iZotope make these excellent tools, they provide a large library of documentation and practical guides to the mixing and mastering processes.

What Is Mix Depth? How to Create Front-Back Space

What Is Mix Depth? How to Create Front-Back Space:

A sense of dimension is a key characteristic that separates professional mixes from amateur ones. Most engineers think of dimension in three ways: height, width, and depth. Height is frequency content and width is the stereo field. Depth is the front-to-back space in a mix and is a tricker area to navigate than the previous two.

Whereas some aspects of music production are driven by emotion or technical prowess, principles of depth draw on “real world” phenomena that deal with how sound moves through a space. In this article, we’ll look at how to add depth to a mix with practical tips related to EQ, timbre, reverb, and more.

The Reason Why You Can’t Hear Your Bass On Small Speakers

The Reason Why You Can’t Hear Your Bass On Small Speakers – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog:

Most of the time the problem comes from misunderstanding exactly what frequencies affect the bass instrument. Too many times we think that it’s the frequencies below 100Hz (especially 60Hz) that provide the bass we need. While it’s quite true that those frequencies are important for what we might call the girth of the sound, they won’t reproduce well on small speakers, and that’s where the problem lies. In other words, EQing too low.

Below 100Hz Girth

120Hz to 200Hz Bottom

250Hz to 320Hz Low-end definition

700Hz Body

1kHz to 1.5kHz High-end definition

2.5kHz to 3kHz String noise/buzz

Do You Need A Subwoofer to Mix Music?

Do You Need A Subwoofer to Mix Music?:

An experienced engineer can track, mix, and master records with very little—a few plug-ins, good converters, and yes, even a pair of headphones. Listen to an episode of The Mastering Show featuring Glenn Schick, an engineer who mastered J Cole’s KOD on a pair of headphones and a mobile rig.

But there is also the sense of wanting more gear, and to this I can attest: in recent years, I’ve expanded my mastering practice, working on projects for artists like Leland Sundries, Morphous, Pete Mancini, and others. Before I made the choice to get a sub, it was always more of a guessing game when it came to low-end. Relentless checks on cars, headphones, the consumer hi-fi, and more were required before sending out the final product.

Which led me to the question of the day: do you need a subwoofer?

After all, many great, inexpensive monitors extend to the lower frequencies. Focal, Avantone, and others have models that go down to 35 Hz and below. Headphones from Sennheiser, Audio-Technica, and Audeze easily reach down that low—some go even lower.

So what can a subwoofer get you that headphones cannot?

7 Tips for Mixing Guitars

7 Tips for Mixing Guitars:

In part one of this four-part series, we focused on the versatility of Neutron 2 for mixing vocals. In part two, we’re using Neutron as an all-in-one dynamics processing tool for guitars. In parts three and four, we’ll be going through tips on using Neutron 2 for bass and drums.

7 Tips for Mixing Bass

7 Tips for Mixing Bass:

In parts one, two, and three of this four-part series, we focused on using Neutron 2 for mixing vocals, mixing guitars, and mixing drums. Now, it’s time to bring on the bass, which can be a tricky bugger. Too much of it can swallow up the mix, but too little of it leaves a mix lacking power and warmth.

7 Tips for Mixing Drums

7 Tips for Mixing Drums:

Drums are a vital element in music. They get people moving and they provide a pulse that keeps songs alive. Well, hopefully they do. If they sound weak, the drums might do nothing more than cause disappointment and even death to your production. Don’t let that happen to you!

7 Tips for Mixing Guitars

7 Tips for Mixing Guitars:

In part one of this four-part series, we focused on the versatility of Neutron 2 for mixing vocals. In part two, we’re using Neutron as an all-in-one dynamics processing tool for guitars. In parts three and four, we’ll be going through tips on using Neutron 2 for bass and drums.

7 Tips for Mixing Vocals

7 Tips for Mixing Vocals:

If you’ve spent any time mixing, you’re already familiar with the struggle of wasting time. Maybe you’re tired of scanning your massive plug-in list when searching for different dynamics processors—compressors, limiters, gates, and more—for different tracks. Perhaps you’re annoyed by having to routinely rearrange your plug-ins on channels and you wish one plug-in could do it all. Or you may be stressed out at the thought of trying to construct an effective processing chain and need something that can do the heavy lifting for you.

In part one of this four-part series, we’ll be using Neutron 2 as an all-in-one dynamics processing tool for vocals. In parts two, three, and four, we’ll be using Neutron 2 for mixing guitars, mixing bass, and mixing drums.

Evolve Your Skills | iZotope

Evolve Your Skills | iZotope:

INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

For those who’ve been around the block, but want to gain even more knowledge, our intermediate-level series includes content focused on EQ, reference tracks, and tips for working on genres and instruments.

Evolve Your Skills | iZotope

Advanced Level

Evolve Your Skills | iZotope:

A true soundmage is never finished learning. The advanced-level series contains in-depth articles on EQ, stereo bus and submixing, compression and dynamic range, and more!

Tips for Mix Bus Processing

3 Techniques for Handling Your Stereo Bus

5 Approaches to Submixes

11 Tips to Fix Cheap Sounding Audio in the Mix

11 Tips to Fix Cheap Sounding Audio in the Mix:

I don’t know about you, but I get a lot of material made in home recording studios. And while a lot of the raw sounds coming my way are great, many recordings sport flaws that impart a palpably “cheap” sound to the material. These flaws have many root causes, such as interfaces that don’t do well for dynamic range or harmonic content; rooms that impart comb filtering to vocals; basses recorded without definition; and badly mic’d drums.

It’s my task, among others, to make these “cheap” sounds feel more “expensive”—that is, to help these mixes play nicely against their better-recorded references. They need to work in a Spotify playlist. They cannot be trounced by the competition. This is my fundamental meaning when I use terms like “cheap” and “expensive.”

The audio in my room doesn’t sound “cheap”, but sometimes I mix it that way by accident.

I want to check this one out…

3. Your snare sounds like someone flicking a piece of paper
Try a cut around 6 kHz, and a boost between 100–200 Hz to see if that adds some body. If you’re lacking impact on snare hits—if it feels a bit flat—try some compression next, emphasizing the transient with a medium attack and a medium-fast release.

You may still hear that dreaded papery noise. If so, solo the snare and see if it goes away. You may be surprised: one of the first things I look for in dealing with a papery snare is whether that sound is actually coming from the kick; often it is. In this case, attenuate that frequency in the kick track with a dynamic equalizer that’s sidechained to the snare. You can easily set this up in Neutron 2, as shown below.

When Is An Audio Production Trick Not A Trick? We Look At 6 Popular Mixing Tricks… Or Not!

Trick or Treat?

Production Expert | When Is An Audio Production Trick Not A Trick? We Look At 6 Popular Mixing Tricks… Or Not!:

Some people refer to “mixing tricks” but are they really tricks? When is a technique just a technique? Julian looks at some common examples and decides.

I like them all. Not very tricky 😉 there’s buttons for that.