Snare-drum Multimiking: Four Recommended Microphone Positions To Mix & Match

Mike Senior at Cambridge Music Technology.

Snare-drum Multimiking: Four Recommended Microphone Positions To Mix & Match

In this video I demonstrate the sound of four different recommended microphone positions you might use when multimiking a snare drum, showcasing the sound characteristics of each mic position with audio examples. In addition, I discuss how you might go about combining them at mixdown.

His books – “Recording Secrets for the Small Studio” and “Mixing Secrets for the Small Studio” are excellent sources of information.

Recording Secrets For The Small Studio

 

Recording Secrets For The Small Studio is an intensive training course specifically designed for small-studio enthusiasts who want a fast track to release-quality results. Based on the backroom strategies of more than 200 famous names, this thorough and down-to-earth guide leads you through a logical sequence of practical tasks to build your live-room skills progressively from the ground up. On the way, you’ll unravel the mysteries of many specialist studio tactics and gain the confidence to tackle a full range of real-world recording situations. User-friendly explanations introduce technical concepts on a strictly need-to-know basis, while chapter summaries, assignments, and extensive online resources are perfect for school and college use.

 

 Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio (2nd Edition)

 

Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio is a best-selling primer for small-studio enthusiasts who want chart-ready sonics in a hurry. Drawing on the back-room strategies of more than 160 famous names, this entertaining and down-to-earth guide leads you step-by-step through the entire mixing process. On the way, you’ll unravel the mysteries of every type of mix processing, from simple EQ and compression through to advanced spectral dynamics and ‘fairy dust’ effects. User-friendly explanations introduce technical concepts on a strictly need-to-know basis, while chapter summaries, assignments, and extensive on-line resources are perfect for school and college use.

 

Open/Close Audio Insert 7 Plug-in Window of focused Track – Logic Pro keyboard command of the day

  Open/Close Audio Insert 7 Plug-in Window of focused Track

Opens or closes the plug-in window of the seventh insert on the channel. We’re almost beyond easy recognition of which insert this will actually work with.

Work in the plug-in window in Logic Pro – Apple Support

The header area at the top of a plug-in window is common to all plug-ins. You can use it to adjust the size of the window, link plug-in windows when more than one is open, switch the plug-in parameter view, and route side chain source signals.

 NB These are Global Commands. You can open the plugin windows for a track even if you can’t see the channel strip in any of the visible views. It’s kind of nice to be able to work with a plugin without the distraction of the standard mixer or channel views.

Gain Staging – Are Your Faders In Charge Of Your Mix? | Production Expert

Gain Staging – Are Your Faders In Charge Of Your Mix? | Production Expert

While perusing the Sonnox website i saw in intriguingly titled article – “Are your EQ Gain Knob and Channel Fader having an affair”?

It is always good to be reminded of the “good practice” of level matching your processors. The principal goal is to have the level of the output of a processor to be the same as the level of the input. If you bypass your processor volume shouldn’t change. If it does change you are lying to your ears.

7 Audio Rendering Tricks You Should Check Out | Production Expert

7 Audio Rendering Tricks You Should Check Out | Production Expert

Since you’re now bouncing all your drum tracks prior to mixing, you might as well go the whole hog and render everything else in your projects as audio, too. This is actually good practise for a couple of reasons beyond just taking the strain off your CPU. First, converting virtual instrument tracks to audio for mixing kills the temptation to fiddle endlessly with sounds that you should have largely settled on by that point in the production process. And second, rendering every channel dry (with faders at unity) and/or ’as mixed’ at the very end of a project creates a future-proof archive of it that you can return to for remixing years later, without worrying about plugin obsolescence or compatibility issues.

I wish I had rendered tracks with effects to save with old projects. I didn’t. Re-visiting them is hard to do since “things change”.

My current practice is to make a new “alternative” to my project and bounce all the tracks in place. This gets me tracks, buses, and stems. If I want to re-visit the mix I just open the penultimate alternative and get to work.

5 Ways To A Better Mix That Don’t Cost A Penny | Pro Tools

5 Ways To A Better Mix That Don’t Cost A Penny | Pro Tools

Mixing can seem like a dark art reserved for the chosen few, for some mixing their first tracks can send their head in a spin. Great mixers are worth their weight in gold and in high demand, but for many, the chance of ever having a top mix engineer get near your stuff is highly unlikely. Here are 5 ways to a better mix that don’t cost a penny.

The Basics of Dynamic EQ (+ 4 Mix Tips) — Pro Audio Files

The Basics of Dynamic EQ (+ 4 Mix Tips) — Pro Audio Files:

In this article, I’m going to take a dive into dynamic EQ and give you some compelling reasons (hint: there’s a great one you can get for free) to consider bringing one into your workflow ASAP.

I have the choice of a couple of different dynamic EQs. I am lucky. I use them all the time in iZotope Nectar and Neutron.

Logic Pro Mixing, Metering, And Loudness Explained – Logic Studio Training

Logic Pro Mixing, Metering, And Loudness Explained – Logic Studio Training

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to make mixing easier and make your mixes sound better by treating Logic Pro like an analog mixing console and emulating an analog workflow.

16 Considerations for Naming New Instrument Presets — Pro Audio Files

16 Considerations for Naming New Instrument Presets — Pro Audio Files

It is human nature to categorize the world in order to make sense of things, and to perhaps mitigate the overwhelming variety that exists in all facets of our environment. Anyone that studies a subject in-depth will need to implement (and in some cases invent) logical ways to compartmentalize concepts in order to better understand the ideas, not only in isolation but as they relate to the larger body of knowledge. This process is not an easy one, and there can be pitfalls concerning things that fall into grey areas or potentially unique items that may not fit into any established category.

6 Tips for Taking the Bedroom Out of Bedroom Recordings — Pro Audio Files

6 Tips for Taking the Bedroom Out of Bedroom Recordings — Pro Audio Files

Among other things, the biggest advantages commercial studios tend to have over bedroom setups include: exciting and well-tuned live rooms (free of problematic resonances), preamps, mics, and overall signal chains that add flattering color to the performances recorded through them, a selection of amps and instruments that bring variety to the sounds used in a session and maybe most importantly, reliable monitoring.

Drum Mixing With Logic Pro X Plug-Ins Only – Two Approaches To The Same Tracks | Logic Pro

‘[Drum Mixing With Logic Pro X Plug-Ins Only – Two Approaches To The Same Tracks | Logic Pro](https://www.pro-tools-expert.com/logic-pro-expert/2020/9/16/drum-mixing-with-logic-pro-x-plug-ins-only-two-approaches-to-the-same-tracks)’

Drum Mixing With Logic Pro X Plug-Ins Only – Two Approaches To The Same Tracks | Logic Pro

Chris Vandeviver and Eli Krantzenberg have been doing a series of collaborative videos. We each tackle the same situation, from two distinct vantage points and approaches. These posts are designed as a vehicle to demonstrate just how flexible Logic Pro X is, and the sometimes dramatically different results that are achieved by two people using the same tools.

How Inter-plugin Communication Shows up in Your Workflow – iZotope

How Inter-plugin Communication Shows up in Your Workflow

by Will Hunt, Product Marketing Manager January 16, 2020

We talk about Inter-plugin Communication in our products, but what does it actually mean? It is not one single feature, but a framework that lets iZotope plug-ins work as a team to help you accomplish common mix tasks that professional engineers tackle on the job every day. In this article, I’ll use the Tonal Balance Bundle to demonstrate ways iZotope plug-ins use this framework to streamline common mixing tasks.

Stems In Music Production – Everything You Need To Know | Production Expert

Stems In Music Production – Everything You Need To Know | Production Expert

The main thing to bear in mind is that you’ll need to duplicate some resources here. On a regular mix you only need one of every effect, say reverb and one delay. But when stemming you need one of these for every stem, routed to the relevant stem bus. Otherwise, you’d have the effects of all the different stems on one stem, and the point is to separate things. So if you’re creating four stems you’ll need four sets of effects busses. You can imagine how quickly this will start to take up system resources if you’re printing a lot of stems, and especially if you’re working in 5.1 or 7.1

Simple enough to create effects tracks for each stem. Just have to remember to do it when mixing the project.

In the Logic Pro X world, if you’re using summing stacks, you might simply want to insert the effects on the stack and use the mix control knob to adjust the levels appropriately. If the recipient of the stems insists on separate effects tracks per stem, well, OK…that’s just not that hard to do.

A good practice would be to create a track for the effects bus (need to do this anyway if you want to bounce the stems) and place it right along with the summing stack in the arrange area.

Use The Waves Scheps Omni Channel To Mix Fast Completely In The Box | Production Expert

Use The Waves Scheps Omni Channel To Mix Fast Completely In The Box | Production Expert

In this free 4 part tutorial series, brought to you with the kind support of Waves, we show you how you can tackle a live band mix quickly using Waves Scheps Omni Channel plug-in. Watch to see and hear how this channel strip differs from more traditional console emulations and generic modular based channel strips. Scheps Omni’s secret sauce is found in both its flexibility and sonic performance which harness some of the best bits of working with analog gear and digital workflows.

I like the Omni Channel for exploring. Works in all the DAWs and I can use it with SoundSource and AudioHijack.

The Complete Guide to Mixing Low End — Pro Audio Files

The Complete Guide to Mixing Low End — Pro Audio Files

Bass. Kick. Sub synths. 808s: All of the things that make music great. And yes, even you, coffee shop open-mic lady with your ukulele, would benefit from some 808s. I will die on that hill. So let’s talk about it.

How low can you go?

The Not-So-Subtle Differences Between White, Pink, Brown And Blue Noise – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

The Not-So-Subtle Differences Between White, Pink, Brown And Blue Noise – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

I know you just read the title and thought, “I knew about white and pink noise, but what the heck is brown and blue noise?” Well, they’re a real thing and used more often than you think. But the differences between white, pink, blue and brown? It all comes down to frequency and amplitude.

Never had it explained so well. Don’t have a generator for Brown and Blue yet.