Tap Tempo – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Tap Tempo

There are multiple places where Tap Tempo can be used. It is a Global Command not assigned to any key, a specific tool in the Smart Tempo editor.

Set the project tempo – Logic Pro X:

 

Assign a key command to Tap Tempo, then use the key command to set the tempo.

The first time you tap the tempo, an alert appears, asking if you want to enable Tap Tempo.

Handy way to get a tempo “idea” out of your head and into the project. Most frequently I take drum tracks or drums and bass tracks and analyze the tempo. It’s easier if the tempo is known, but hey…

Work in the Smart Tempo Editor – Logic Pro X:

 

You can make adjustments in two different ways: by playing the file or selection and tapping the D and T keys on your computer keyboard to indicate downbeats (D) and beats (T), or by editing beat markers in the main display. When tapping in a selection, only the downbeats or beats in the selected area are changed.

 

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Toggle Hide Group 16 – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Toggle Hide Group 16

Hmm. 32 groups. The keyboard commands for 1 through 9 are ⌃⇧1 to ⌃⇧9 .

The commands do what I expect. If there is a group numbered ‘n’ the command toggles the view of the tracks/channels. Hidden, but not like “Hide Track”.

Groups appear to be very useful. I should use them more. I fooled around with them a bit to try and change colors more easily, but they do so much more.

Groups are “mixer groups”. The overview helps us get started.

Groups overview
The Mixer groups feature is only available when Show Advanced Tools is selected in the Advanced preferences pane.

Prior to mixing, you may find it useful to define some logical channel strip groups. You could, for example, group all drum channel strips under one drum group. This would allow you to control the group meters (volume, pan, mute, solo, sends, and so on) using a single control, while still maintaining the relative parameter values of each channel strip.

Excerpt From: Apple Inc. “Logic Pro X User Guide.” iBooks. 

 

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Set Scissors Tool ⌥:three: – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Set Scissors Tool        ⌥:three:

I don’t edit audio very much. I typically put the playhead where I want to split a region, and use the split region command – ⌘T. It would probably be better for my workflow to start using the Marquee tool to select the area I want split apart and use the “Split Regions/Events at Locators or Marquee selection” – ⌃⌘T

If I had a touch bar that would speed things up as well.

It is important to remember to cross-fade between regions if there is sound happening. I have the fade tool and marquee tool enabled when the pointer tool is in the proper location. Makes fades easy. If I set the Scissors tool via the above command I now have to switch back to the pointer tool to do a simple fade. 

We shall see how this works out.

Common tools – Logic Pro X:

 

The most common tools are briefly described in the following section. Tools for specific working areas or editors are covered in the respective chapters.

 

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Toggle Track On ⌥M – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Toggle Track On    ⌥M

Tracks can be turned on and off. This command toggles the on/off state of the track. If the on/off button is not currently being displayed in the track header using this command will cause the on/off button to be displayed. Regions in a track that is turned off have their color changed to gray.

I have started to use on/off control of tracks to un-clutter my mixes. Tracks that are printed with effects, or are parallel processing tracks are likely candidates. I will typically protect these tracks as well so I cannot modify them. They got printed this way for a reason, I shouldn’t presume to know better.

Turn off tracks – Logic Pro X:

When no other track is assigned to the same channel strip, turning off a track also saves processing power, because plug-ins on the channel strip are no longer processed. Turning a track off (or turning it back on) takes slightly longer than muting or unmuting the track, due to internal pre-processing. Unlike muting a track, turning off a track can not be automated.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Copy MIDI Events… – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Copy MIDI Events…

The command is found in the “Edit” menu of the usual places – Tracks, Events, Piano Roll. Unlikely that I would turn this into a keyboard command. There are lots of things to be fiddled with.

Edit events overview – Logic Pro X:

The Event List L(ock), M(ute), Position, Status, Ch(annel), Num(ber), Val(ue), and Length/Info columns display all details of all event types. In most cases, you can directly edit the data displayed (except for the Status column, which indicates the event type).

 

 There is more detailed discussion of this in the Piano Roll documentation.

Copy notes in the Piano Roll Editor – Logic Pro X:

There are a number of ways to copy or move notes in the Piano Roll Editor. In addition to Option-dragging or using the Copy and Paste menu commands, there are advanced Copy and Move operations such as directly swapping events, or merging a group of notes from one section of a region to the same region, or another region.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Add Mapping – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Add Mapping

Smart Controls. Mapping parameters to Smart Controls is kind of tedious. The benefit is the Smart Controls can be used in Logic Remote, so control is possible while away from the computer. The controls are also mappable to the Control Surfaces.

Map screen controls to channel strip and plug-in parameters – Logic Pro X:

When Show Advanced Tools is selected in the Advanced preferences pane, you can map screen controls to channel strip and plug-in parameters for the selected track. Each screen control can be mapped to one or more channel strip or plug-in parameters for the selected track. Parameter mappings are saved with the patch.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Octave – 2 ⇧Z – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Octave - 2 ⇧Z

Move the “selected” octave down 2. I’m not really sure how this is useful unless it is because it makes it easier to see the location of keys on the keyboard.

I am more likely to be using the “Musical Typing” keyboard.

Step Input Keyboard – Logic Pro X:

Table reflects default keyboard shortcuts included in the U.S. factory preset.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Apply Transform User Preset 4 to selected Events – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Apply Transform User Preset 4 to selected Events

The MIDI Transform window. All things programatic start here. It appears that we can define 30 presets for the transformation window. It would be good to remember the variant “Select and Operate Preset”. See tomorrow’s post.

 

MIDI Transform window overview – Logic Pro X:

The MIDI Transform window is so-named because it transforms MIDI events—based on conditions, operations, and values you choose—into different types of events, or events with different values.

The MIDI Transform window is a powerful tool for edits that would otherwise be impossible (or tedious). For example, imagine an orchestral project that has been sent to you for editing. The individual violin and viola parts were recorded with a different string library. Two hundred MIDI regions contain aftertouch information that introduces an unpleasant pitch modulation, and some sample layer switching artifacts when played with your string samples. After looking at this aftertouch information, you discover that only a small range of values is causing the problem. Your options: edit your sampler instruments, manually remove all aftertouch information (region by region, or globally, thus losing the performance benefits that the aftertouch information provides), or alter the problematic values in the MIDI Transform window.

A number of preset transform sets are available for many common editing tasks. These may be all you’ll ever require, but should the need arise, you can create and save your own transform sets, and recall them later.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Solo Mode ⌃S – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Solo Mode    ⌃S

Solo the selected region(s). I have learned to use the Solo Tool for listening to tracks to investigate. Using Solo Mode will help me during mixing and editing.

Mute and solo regions in the Tracks area – Logic Pro X:

You can mute one or more regions in the Tracks area to exclude them from playback. You can also solo individual regions, to hear them in isolation, and lock the solo status of regions.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Logic Pro | E is For EQ

Logic Pro | E is For EQ:

Equalizers are the most fundamental tool we have to shape the sound flowing through our tracks. There are different types, shapes, curves, and controls, but they all fundamentally do the same thing. Boost or attenuate specific areas of the frequency spectrum.

Set Smart Tempo MTR Handling to Ignore – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Set Smart Tempo MTR Handling to Ignore

Nothing. Zip. Nada. Cannot locate anything that remotely refers to “MTR Handling”.

Unless that is shorthand for “Musical tempo reference” which I found here…

Smart Tempo overview – Logic Pro X:

Musical tempo reference

When using Smart Tempo in Adapt mode (or when Auto uses Adapt behavior), the results depend on whether a musical tempo reference is present in the part of the project to which you are recording or adding a file. A musical tempo reference exists when the metronome is active, when audio, MIDI, or Drummer regions are present in the part of the project where you are working, or when Cycle mode is turned on.

In most cases, when you hear any musical material while recording, a musical tempo reference is present. If you do not hear any material, no musical tempo reference is present.

Tip: To avoid having a musical tempo reference while recording, solo the track you are recording to before recording.

Given the description here the commands start to make sense. Setting MTR Handling to “ignore” would have the same effect as soloing the track being recorded to, except that you would still hear the musical reference.

Toggle Smart Tempo Mode (Keep/Adapt) 
Set Smart Tempo Mode to Keep
Set Smart Tempo Mode to Adapt
Set Smart Tempo Mode to Automatic ⌃⌥8⃣
Toggle Smart Tempo MTR Handling
Set Smart Tempo MTR Handling to Write
Set Smart Tempo MTR Handling to Ignore
Toggle Smart Tempo Trim to Downbeat

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Set Layout Tool – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Set Layout Tool


Choose the “Layout Tool” in the “left-click” tool drop down (same place as pointer, solo, et al.)

The Layout Tool is what you use to change the position of a note in the score without affecting the actual time placement of the note. If you use the Pointer Tool to drag a note from 4 1 1 1 to the left to 3 1 1 1 the note will move, and apparently “replace” anything that used to be between 3 1 1 1 and 4 1 1 1.

If you use the Layout Tool to move the note left or right (no vertical movement is possible) the placement of the event in time will not change. You can move a note at 4 1 1 1 to the left to get it closer to the bar line, or to the right to get closer to the next note. Timing will not change.

It is best to use a MIDI loop and play with it in the Score Editor to get a feeling for what is possible.

Position items graphically in the Score Editor – Logic Pro X:

Using the Layout tool: The Layout tool is used to graphically move events in the Score Editor, in order to optimize the display without altering the timing of MIDI events.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Open System Performance…  – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Open System Performance…


Opens the performance meters. Typically I get to this window by double-clicking on the performance meter in the control bar.

System overload alerts in Logic Pro X – Apple Support:

Use the meters in the Logic Pro CPU/HD window to monitor system performance while working on a project. To view the CPU/HD window:

1. Choose View > Customize Control Bar and Display.

2. Choose Custom from the pop-up menu in the LCD section.

3. Select the Load Meters (CPU/HD) checkbox, then click OK.

4.A CPU/HD meter appears on the right side of the LCD. Double-click the CPU meter to open it in a new, expanded window.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Lesson 2 Recording Audio – Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Music Production

Lesson 2 Recording Audio – Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Music Production:

In this lesson, you will configure Logic for audio recording and study activities you will typically perform when working with live musicians: recording a single instrument, recording additional takes of the same instrument, cycle recording, multitrack recording, punching on the fly, and automatic punching.

Next up in the course. I will go ahead and plug in the guitar and work through the tuning exercise, along with some comping. It’s not something that I would normally do (guitar), but I have one…so…

A Little Help From Your Friends

The story starts with me wanting to get more in-depth knowledge of “Project Audio”. I started by looking at a used Logic Pro 9 book – the one that is used for the Apple Certification course – “Logic Pro 9 and Logic Express 9 – Professional Audio Production”. All through the book there are references to the resources contained on the DVD that came with the book. Sigh. Used book, no DVD. Hunt for online copy. I wound up at PeachPit Press staring at a place where I could use ‘Safari On Line’ to read the book. This really didn’t help much.

Ding. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has online books and courses available to members. I have maintained my membership since the early 1980s. I haven’t had much use for the computing and database courses that I used to access. The coursework uses the “Safari Learning Platform” to help us move forward. This might be the same “Safari On Line” that I was staring at over at PeachPit.

I logged in to the platform and searched for the book, and found “Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Audio Production”. Excellent. I started reading and came to the section about downloading course-related resources. Followed a not-too-clear path to get access to the download (ISBN number, answer the question to show that I have the book). Download the files. Good to go.

I don’t really want to do this using a web browser while I am trying to run Logic Pro X, so I figured out how to get the O’Reilly reading app onto my iPad. Perfect. I can read my book on the iPad and work on the screen with Logic Pro X.

I started at the beginning, followed all the steps, turned on “Quick Help” which pops up little help balloons as the mouse hovers over a tool. Yes. I have done this before. There is a little hint at the bottom that says “Type command-/ to get more info”. That brings up the help document – very slow. Then I read this…

“To go further, read the Logic Pro Help documentation within the free Logic Remote iPad app. The documentation automatically displays the section relevant to the Logic Pro X area where you place the mouse pointer”

Whoa! Hmmm. Now I need another iPad to see what they mean. We happen to have kept an older iPad as a resource. I am in luck.

Install “Logic Remote” on the iPad, follow a couple of helpful hints in the app, and there it is. The iPad is showing me the details from the help documentation. The very same help resource that I am linking to and using in my “Logic Pro X – Command of the Day” blog posts.

I need to try doing “actual work” in Logic with the “helpPad” connected to see how I like it, but for my daily homework and study of Logic Pro X I am now way far ahead.

Stay tuned.