Drum Overheads – A Stereo Pair Or Cymbal Spot Mics? | Production Expert

Drum Overheads – A Stereo Pair Or Cymbal Spot Mics? | Production Expert

In a recent conversation among the team we were discussing what the thinking was behind the apparently common practice of using a spaced pair of cardioid mics, often facing inwards, as a pair of overheads on drums? If the idea of a pair of overheads is to capture a stereo picture of the whole kit, rather than be cymbal mics, then exactly what is this arrangement trying to achieve and where does it come from?

Good examples of how to capture a drum kit. Lots of examples and clear discussion.

6 Tips for Recording Interviews in the Field

6 Tips for Recording Interviews in the Field

by Nick Messitte, iZotope Contributor July 1, 2019

6 tips to get the most out of your next interview or tape sync project.
Recently, I stepped away from my mixing duties to report a piece for WHYY, an NPR station based out of Philadelphia. The gig got me out of the studio, recording interviews in a variety of locations, and dusting off a bag of in-the-field tricks that might be of some benefit to you.

If this sort of work intrigues you—interviewing people in the field for radio and podcasts and the like—read on. We’ll cover the right tools for the job and some good techniques for getting a quality sound.

Classical Music: Recording, Mixing, and Mastering Fundamentals

Classical Music: Recording, Mixing, and Mastering Fundamentals

by Jett Galindo, iZotope Contributor July 3, 2019

Recording, mixing, and mastering classical music requires different techniques than most modern productions.
Classical music is known for its nuanced sonics—from the wide dynamics all the way to its vast range in the frequency spectrum. With that comes a unique set of challenges for sound engineers when recording, mixing, and mastering classical music.

Deep Dive Into Smart Tempo (& Quantize Tracks Not Recorded to a Click)

Why Logic Pro Rules

Deep Dive Into Smart Tempo (& Quantize Tracks Not Recorded to a Click)

Unfamiliar with Smart Tempo? It’s only the best thing to happen to musicians who don’t want to play like a robot to a click track.

Select Previous Section for Realtime Comping ⌃⌥⇧7⃣ – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Select Previous Section for Realtime Comping       ⌃⌥⇧7⃣

It reads like a marker is placed in the timeline. Recording, especially multiple takes, is not one of the primary uses I have for Logic.

Mark takes while recording – Logic Pro X

 

This command places a tag in the current take, at the position the keyboard shortcut was used. All audio that precedes the use of the keyboard shortcut is tagged as a good take, and is used in the final comp.

 

Create and save comps – Logic Pro X

You can use quick swipe comping techniques to select the best parts from several takes, combining these parts into one master comp. After creating a comp, it’s a good idea to save it so that you can easily return to it at a later point. Any subsequent changes automatically create a new comp.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Studio One’s Percussion Part Generator – PreSonus Blog

Studio One’s Percussion Part Generator – PreSonus Blog

Shakers, tambourines, eggs, maracas, and the like can add life and interest to a song by complementing the drum track. But it’s not always easy to play this kind of part. It has to be consistent, but not busy; humble enough to stay in the background, but strong enough to add impact…and this sounds like a job for version 4.5’s new MIDI features.

The Standard LUFS Standards Levels Every Mixer Should Know – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

The Standard LUFS Standards Levels Every Mixer Should Know – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

Looking back at the analog days, mixing level requirements seemed so easy. You aimed for 0 on the VU meter and didn’t worry too much if it bounced over. Of course, under the hood 0VU could actually be calibrated to different levels, but we usually didn’t concern ourselves too much with that as long as it was clean around the 0 mark. These days there are so many different meter reference calibrations available that it can take some time to settle on one that you feel comfortable with. That said, LUFS looms large when it comes to delivery signal levels, and that makes for lots of confusion.

 

Select Previous Section for Realtime Comping – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Select Previous Section for Realtime Comping

Comping is a mystery to me. It sets apart what can be done in the studio as opposed to recording live performance. Multiple takes I understand, you perform until it’s right. Punch in I understand, fix the spot where it is necessary.

Chopping parts of multiple takes and combining them is just counter to how I perceive music and its creation. Much work needs to be done to figure out the details.

Comping overview – Logic Pro X

 

Imagine a scenario in which you have recorded multiple performances of a vocal solo over the same section of a project. You can select the best parts from the different performances and piece them together into a single master take. This is the process of “making a composite take”—commonly referred to as comping—and is achieved by using the Quick Swipe Comping feature. You can also drag or cut the contents of take folders.

 

 

 Punch in and out of audio recordings – Logic Pro X

 

Punch recording is a technique you can use to overwrite a portion of a previously recorded track, during playback, without touching any of the recording before or after that portion. You punch in to interrupt playback and make the recording, then punch out to return to playback mode. You can choose between two punch recording modes: Quick Punch-In mode and Autopunch mode.

 

 Record multiple audio takes – Logic Pro X

When you’re recording, you can record multiple versions, or takes, of a phrase or section in quick succession. Take recording can be helpful especially when you’re improvising a lead or solo part and want to capture several versions while you’re feeling inspired.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

- Global Commands
Select Previous Section for Realtime Comping ⌃⌥⇧7⃣

- Main Window Tracks and Various Editors
Snap Quick Swipe Comping On/Off

- Main Window Tracks
Rename Take or Comp ⇧T
Delete Take or Comp ⌥⇧⌫
Export Active Take or Comp to New Track
Move Active Take or Comp to New Track
Toggle Take Folder Quick Swipe Comping Mode ⌥Q
Create New Comp
Select Previous Take or Comp ⌥⇧↑
Select Next Take or Comp ⌥⇧↓
Slice at Comp Section Borders
Trim to Active Comp Sections

Q. How do I make guitars sound more ‘epic’? |

Q. How do I make guitars sound more ‘epic’? |:

I’ve been struggling with recording and mixing ‘epic’ guitar sounds. I’m after something that balances aggression with tone, but which doesn’t sound too distorted like so many contemporary hard-rock records do today. Do you have any tips that might help?

Great tips from Mike Senior as usual.

Lesson 2 Recording Audio – Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Music Production

Lesson 2 Recording Audio – Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Music Production:

In this lesson, you will configure Logic for audio recording and study activities you will typically perform when working with live musicians: recording a single instrument, recording additional takes of the same instrument, cycle recording, multitrack recording, punching on the fly, and automatic punching.

Next up in the course. I will go ahead and plug in the guitar and work through the tuning exercise, along with some comping. It’s not something that I would normally do (guitar), but I have one…so…

11 Considerations When Recording Background Vocals – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

11 Considerations When Recording Background Vocals – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog:

Recording background vocals is a distinctly different process from recording solo vocals because of how they will eventually fit in the mix. That requires a different technique for both recording and production in order to get the best result. Here are 11 background vocal-related points lifted from the 4th edition of my Recording Engineer’s Handbook that can help you take those background vocals to the next level.

Some handy tips.

GarageBand for iOS (iPad): Jam with other GarageBand users

GarageBand for iOS (iPad): Jam with other GarageBand users:

You can make music with other GarageBand users sharing a Wi-Fi connection. The bandleader creates a jam session, then up to three band members can join the jam session. Playback and recording are synchronized between all devices, so everyone can play and record together as a band. The leader can keep exclusive control of playback and recording, or allow all members to share control.

Jamestown Revival: “Crazy World (Judgement Day)” | Today’s Top Tune | Free Online Music Streaming | KCRW | KCRW

Jamestown Revival: “Crazy World (Judgement Day)” | Today’s Top Tune | Free Online Music Streaming | KCRW | KCRW:

Crazy World (Judgement Day)” is the first glimpse into Jamestown Revival’s forthcoming LP. Band members Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance sat down to reflect on shared experiences about the crazy world we live in, hence the delivery of  “Crazy World (Judgement Day).”

I really like the sound of the vocals. Well-centered with a bit of width.

Audio Gain, Volume, & Gain Staging – Produce Like A Pro

Audio Gain, Volume, & Gain Staging – Produce Like A Pro:

If audio gain is reserved to describe the input level on a source, then volume is the measurable output level of a signal, after processing. Volume is typically measured in dB SPL and can be boiled down to the loudness we actually hear.

Mixing in your DAW, every track is routed to a stereo channel, or “mix buss.” How loud the output of the mix buss is can be called “volume!”

Well put. Gain/trim = input. Volume = output. Wonder where we put “level”?

I still have to deal with bands who think the right thing to do to get the “sound” right for the wedges and the room (sigh) is to turn up the trim pot. All the faders must be at unity…

I’m really enjoying the things I get to listen to and read from the Produce Like a Pro Academy. We’re not in Kansas anymore.

EQ Cheat Sheet: Simple Guidelines for Effective Equalization – Produce Like A Pro

EQ Cheat Sheet: Simple Guidelines for Effective Equalization – Produce Like A Pro:

Understanding equalization–probably the most widely used signal processor available to engineers–is essential to making records sound their absolute best. Sometimes it’s as simple as high-passing an instrument in the proper spot, while other cases require a bit more attention and precision. Either way, EQ is fundamental to making mix elements sound more or less defined, larger or smaller, or “better” versus “different.” Having a general reference like an EQ cheat sheet will help get you where you want to go more quickly.

In response to a request at the Produce Like a Pro Academy I went hunting for some easy to access cheatsheets. This is one of a few.