Gain Staging In Your DAW Software

Gain Staging In Your DAW Software | Sound on Sound

On the face of it, gain staging couldn’t be simpler: you ensure that you feed an appropriate level from the first stage of your signal path to the next, and repeat this from the second stage to the third… and so on, all the way from your instruments, mics and preamps to the final stereo mix bus. By ‘appropriate’, I mean an ample level, which ensures a healthy signal-to-noise ratio (the difference between the wanted signal and the noise floor), while leaving enough headroom that you needn’t worry about whether the signal might be clipping.

Today is a good day to re-calibrate the studio monitors. I found the suggestion of setting DAW faders to about -6 dB to start in this article a long while back.

I set my Logic Pro X templates to have channels start there.

A Philosophical Guide to the Role(s) of an Audio Engineer — Pro Audio Files

A Philosophical Guide to the Role(s) of an Audio Engineer — Pro Audio Files

Record production is a team sport. From writers to producers to artist to engineers to managers and A&Rs, the goal is to create a song, cement it in time, and get it out to listeners. So where does the engineer fit into this picture? What exactly is our role, what are our boundaries and what are our expectations?

De facto producer when one is not present. Yes, that would be a really good starting point.

The Complete Guide to Recording Electric Guitar — Pro Audio Files

The Complete Guide to Recording Electric Guitar — Pro Audio Files

One of the biggest fundamentals of getting great guitar tone is having a taste for great guitar tone. It would be hard to cook something in the French culinary style if you’ve never had French food. Yet, I see a lot of guitarists and engineers approach recording guitar this way.

At the heart of any great tone is great ears. Tools like microphones and amps can help sculpt your tone, but if you haven’t acquired a taste for fine tone, how will you know when you’ve arrived?

It’s not simply a matter of placing a mic in position and pressing record. Great guitar tone is often the culmination of many elements.

This sums up lots of thoughts about electric guitar (and other things run through the amps and pedals). 

My struggle is with DI signal that’s way too distorted when distorted, and way too loud when the volume pedal got pressed (I think it was a wah-wah). Finally figured out something that started to work, but still have a very hard time.