The Standard LUFS Standards Levels Every Mixer Should Know – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

The Standard LUFS Standards Levels Every Mixer Should Know – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

Looking back at the analog days, mixing level requirements seemed so easy. You aimed for 0 on the VU meter and didn’t worry too much if it bounced over. Of course, under the hood 0VU could actually be calibrated to different levels, but we usually didn’t concern ourselves too much with that as long as it was clean around the 0 mark. These days there are so many different meter reference calibrations available that it can take some time to settle on one that you feel comfortable with. That said, LUFS looms large when it comes to delivery signal levels, and that makes for lots of confusion.

 

Select Previous Section for Realtime Comping – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Select Previous Section for Realtime Comping

Comping is a mystery to me. It sets apart what can be done in the studio as opposed to recording live performance. Multiple takes I understand, you perform until it’s right. Punch in I understand, fix the spot where it is necessary.

Chopping parts of multiple takes and combining them is just counter to how I perceive music and its creation. Much work needs to be done to figure out the details.

Comping overview – Logic Pro X

 

Imagine a scenario in which you have recorded multiple performances of a vocal solo over the same section of a project. You can select the best parts from the different performances and piece them together into a single master take. This is the process of “making a composite take”—commonly referred to as comping—and is achieved by using the Quick Swipe Comping feature. You can also drag or cut the contents of take folders.

 

 

 Punch in and out of audio recordings – Logic Pro X

 

Punch recording is a technique you can use to overwrite a portion of a previously recorded track, during playback, without touching any of the recording before or after that portion. You punch in to interrupt playback and make the recording, then punch out to return to playback mode. You can choose between two punch recording modes: Quick Punch-In mode and Autopunch mode.

 

 Record multiple audio takes – Logic Pro X

When you’re recording, you can record multiple versions, or takes, of a phrase or section in quick succession. Take recording can be helpful especially when you’re improvising a lead or solo part and want to capture several versions while you’re feeling inspired.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

- Global Commands
Select Previous Section for Realtime Comping ⌃⌥⇧7⃣

- Main Window Tracks and Various Editors
Snap Quick Swipe Comping On/Off

- Main Window Tracks
Rename Take or Comp ⇧T
Delete Take or Comp ⌥⇧⌫
Export Active Take or Comp to New Track
Move Active Take or Comp to New Track
Toggle Take Folder Quick Swipe Comping Mode ⌥Q
Create New Comp
Select Previous Take or Comp ⌥⇧↑
Select Next Take or Comp ⌥⇧↓
Slice at Comp Section Borders
Trim to Active Comp Sections

Q. How do I make guitars sound more ‘epic’? |

Q. How do I make guitars sound more ‘epic’? |:

I’ve been struggling with recording and mixing ‘epic’ guitar sounds. I’m after something that balances aggression with tone, but which doesn’t sound too distorted like so many contemporary hard-rock records do today. Do you have any tips that might help?

Great tips from Mike Senior as usual.

Lesson 2 Recording Audio – Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Music Production

Lesson 2 Recording Audio – Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Music Production:

In this lesson, you will configure Logic for audio recording and study activities you will typically perform when working with live musicians: recording a single instrument, recording additional takes of the same instrument, cycle recording, multitrack recording, punching on the fly, and automatic punching.

Next up in the course. I will go ahead and plug in the guitar and work through the tuning exercise, along with some comping. It’s not something that I would normally do (guitar), but I have one…so…

11 Considerations When Recording Background Vocals – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

11 Considerations When Recording Background Vocals – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog:

Recording background vocals is a distinctly different process from recording solo vocals because of how they will eventually fit in the mix. That requires a different technique for both recording and production in order to get the best result. Here are 11 background vocal-related points lifted from the 4th edition of my Recording Engineer’s Handbook that can help you take those background vocals to the next level.

Some handy tips.

GarageBand for iOS (iPad): Jam with other GarageBand users

GarageBand for iOS (iPad): Jam with other GarageBand users:

You can make music with other GarageBand users sharing a Wi-Fi connection. The bandleader creates a jam session, then up to three band members can join the jam session. Playback and recording are synchronized between all devices, so everyone can play and record together as a band. The leader can keep exclusive control of playback and recording, or allow all members to share control.

Jamestown Revival: “Crazy World (Judgement Day)” | Today’s Top Tune | Free Online Music Streaming | KCRW | KCRW

Jamestown Revival: “Crazy World (Judgement Day)” | Today’s Top Tune | Free Online Music Streaming | KCRW | KCRW:

Crazy World (Judgement Day)” is the first glimpse into Jamestown Revival’s forthcoming LP. Band members Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance sat down to reflect on shared experiences about the crazy world we live in, hence the delivery of  “Crazy World (Judgement Day).”

I really like the sound of the vocals. Well-centered with a bit of width.

Audio Gain, Volume, & Gain Staging – Produce Like A Pro

Audio Gain, Volume, & Gain Staging – Produce Like A Pro:

If audio gain is reserved to describe the input level on a source, then volume is the measurable output level of a signal, after processing. Volume is typically measured in dB SPL and can be boiled down to the loudness we actually hear.

Mixing in your DAW, every track is routed to a stereo channel, or “mix buss.” How loud the output of the mix buss is can be called “volume!”

Well put. Gain/trim = input. Volume = output. Wonder where we put “level”?

I still have to deal with bands who think the right thing to do to get the “sound” right for the wedges and the room (sigh) is to turn up the trim pot. All the faders must be at unity…

I’m really enjoying the things I get to listen to and read from the Produce Like a Pro Academy. We’re not in Kansas anymore.

EQ Cheat Sheet: Simple Guidelines for Effective Equalization – Produce Like A Pro

EQ Cheat Sheet: Simple Guidelines for Effective Equalization – Produce Like A Pro:

Understanding equalization–probably the most widely used signal processor available to engineers–is essential to making records sound their absolute best. Sometimes it’s as simple as high-passing an instrument in the proper spot, while other cases require a bit more attention and precision. Either way, EQ is fundamental to making mix elements sound more or less defined, larger or smaller, or “better” versus “different.” Having a general reference like an EQ cheat sheet will help get you where you want to go more quickly.

In response to a request at the Produce Like a Pro Academy I went hunting for some easy to access cheatsheets. This is one of a few.

The Ultimate EQ Cheat Sheet for Every Common Instrument

The Ultimate EQ Cheat Sheet for Every Common Instrument:

A subtractive approach to EQ

Not everyone’s ethos on EQ is the same, and most people may never see eye to eye on EQ approach. That being said, I come from the camp that subtractive over additive tends to be better for your mix in most cases. Now, I’m not saying to live in a strictly subtractive world; I do make boosts from time to time when needed or appropriate, but it’s probably a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio of cuts to boosts.

The question was asked in the Produce Like a Pro Academy. Here is one idea of a “standard” EQ cheatsheet.

How to Choose a Reverb for Music Production

How to Choose a Reverb for Music Production:

But before we begin, one caveat: there is no such thing as a bad reverb. One reverb may work incredibly well on one instrument while sounding disastrously bad on another. And furthermore, the same reverb may sound great on a guitar on one song, and create a very muddy mix on the same guitar on another song. Making the decision as to which reverb to select is personal. This guide is meant to be an idea-sparking tool to help you in the process.

Always good to share…

Scale of the Day – Ab Major

Ab Major / Ab Bb C Db Eb F G Ab / 4b Bb Eb Ab Db —
F minor / F G Ab Bb C Db Eb F G / 4b Bb Eb Ab Db —

Every morning. Find the scale on the piano. Do the I / IV / I / V / V7 / I chords. Do the i / iv / i / V / V7 / i chords,

I like doing the i , i sus4, V chords as well.

I should really remember to fire up Logic Pro X with my “Quick Record” template before I hit the keyboard. The template has an audio track set to my Advanced Audio DM20 (RE20ish) and a MIDI track ready to record (E-piano).

Gain Staging in Logic Pro – What Is It, & Does It Even Matter?

Gain Staging in Logic Pro – What Is It, & Does It Even Matter?:

There are few things that strike so much fear or disdain for Logic users than the word gain staging.

I am a firm believer in gain staging. I did it a lot setting up for recording live from a Mackie mixer. The band thought the proper way to control volume was to adjust the trim pots, never mind the faders on the board. I tried to do it every time, but that wasn’t always easy. It was the same room almost always, so the pictures I took of the mixer helped a lot.

Did the sound change when properly gain-staged? Absolutely.

Gain Staging In Your DAW Software

Gain Staging In Your DAW Software | Sound on Sound

On the face of it, gain staging couldn’t be simpler: you ensure that you feed an appropriate level from the first stage of your signal path to the next, and repeat this from the second stage to the third… and so on, all the way from your instruments, mics and preamps to the final stereo mix bus. By ‘appropriate’, I mean an ample level, which ensures a healthy signal-to-noise ratio (the difference between the wanted signal and the noise floor), while leaving enough headroom that you needn’t worry about whether the signal might be clipping.

Today is a good day to re-calibrate the studio monitors. I found the suggestion of setting DAW faders to about -6 dB to start in this article a long while back.

I set my Logic Pro X templates to have channels start there.

A Philosophical Guide to the Role(s) of an Audio Engineer — Pro Audio Files

A Philosophical Guide to the Role(s) of an Audio Engineer — Pro Audio Files

Record production is a team sport. From writers to producers to artist to engineers to managers and A&Rs, the goal is to create a song, cement it in time, and get it out to listeners. So where does the engineer fit into this picture? What exactly is our role, what are our boundaries and what are our expectations?

De facto producer when one is not present. Yes, that would be a really good starting point.