Record off for all – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

  Record off for all

Turns off “Record” for all channels. I can’t seem to find any specific documentation for this.

“Record off for all” is mapped to OPTION+REC button on an MCU. If you press and hold OPTION, then press REC all channels will have Record turned off.

Mackie Control channel strips (1 to 8) – Control Surfaces Help

OPTION
Disable Record Enable button for all tracks.

 

1962 BBC Training Manual | Martin Mitchell’s Microphones

1962 BBC Training Manual | Martin Mitchell’s Microphones

In the 1951 BBC Microphones training manual we saw that the corporation functioned with a small selection of British manufactured microphones, most of which had been in service since the 1930’s.  So when I saw this Manual from 1962 I was curious to see how ‘Auntie’ had moved on into the swinging sixties.

The microphone layouts for orchestra and “dance bands” are outstanding.

What a neat resource.

How To Record Edit And Mix A Choir Remotely For A UK TV Broadcast | Production Expert

How To Record Edit And Mix A Choir Remotely For A UK TV Broadcast | Production Expert

On Thursday, April 16th 2020, Lucy shared an ITV news segment of a moving tribute to our wonderful National Health Service (NHS) workers and those who have lost their lives to COVID-19 here is the UK. Apart from making her tear up just a tad, the main reason she shared it was because it was something she worked on with her husband Phil, the Musical Director of The Lewisham & Greenwich NHS Choir (the one waving his arms about in the video). In this article, Lucy explains how it came about and how they managed to pull it off. Over to Lucy.

Well of course I have to have a link to a case study of driving a  choir over the internet…

Select Next Take or Comp ⌥⇧↓ – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Select Next Take or Comp   ⌥⇧↓

Unheard of in my days of making music. Now, choose the best parts and put them to good use. The differences between performances and productions…

Comping overview – Logic Pro X

Imagine a scenario in which you have recorded multiple performances of a vocal solo over the same section of a project. You can select the best parts from the different performances and piece them together into a single master take. This is the process of “making a composite take”—commonly referred to as comping—and is achieved by using the Quick Swipe Comping feature. You can also drag or cut the contents of take folders.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Record Repeat – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Record Repeat

The description makes it sound like a “cycle” recording, but that would be better described by multiple takes. Use this command to not make a new take, but to simply delete the current recording and start recording anew.

I expect that this would be a very handy command to program into Logic Remote. Using Logic Remote to control recording is an excellent idea, and remarkably useful for doing self recordings. No need to sit in front of the computer to drive the DAW, just be in the recording position and use a tool in your hands or next to you.

Advanced recording commands – Logic Pro X

Record/Record Repeat: Use to delete the recording, move the playhead back to the recording start position, and start recording again.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Set Punch In Locator by Rounded Playhead – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Set Punch In Locator by Rounded Playhead

Sets the punch in point at the nearest bar. I cannot really tell where the rounded playhead will be when using the SMPTE ruler.

Punch In/Out is such a wonderful thing to have. Take that! magnetic tape 😉

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Has The Home Recording Studio Dream Become A Nightmare? Are You Tired Of Fighting Technology? | Production Expert

Has The Home Recording Studio Dream Become A Nightmare? Are You Tired Of Fighting Technology? | Production Expert

I did something this week that I rarely do these days, I went to another studio to produce some vocals. Why would I go to another studio? I could have walked up to the end of my garden (yard for my American cousins) which takes all of 30 seconds on a long commute, and had the talent come to me. However, on this occasion, I had been asked to produce a track in a local studio, it had been booked, and all I had to do was turn up and do the magic.

Toggle Allow Quick Punch-in – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Toggle Allow Quick Punch-in

The magic of the modern recording process – digital editing – the zero-crossing.

Logic allows for 1000 tracks now, so any conceivable limit (128 tracks required to quick-punch 64 tracks) is gone.

Quick punch-in and out are probably best used by a producer/engineer while “the talent” is playing. If you are self-engineering auto punch is probably more useful.

Autopunch can be controlled very easily from the MCU using the DROP button (need to find out why drop).

I have mapped a few of the Autopunch commands into Logic Remote for my iPhone. That’s handy. Adding an iPad to the set of active tools in the studio becomes more and more important.

Punch in and out of audio recordings – Logic Pro X

A useful and common recording practice is to switch in and out of recording mode while listening to the previously recorded material, sometimes referred to as “punching in on the fly.” This helps you fix mistakes or create alternate takes for a particular section. To ensure the transition between playing and recording occurs without any audible gaps, you must turn on Quick Punch-In mode.

 

 Use the Mackie Control Drop button – Control Surfaces Help

To activate Punch view, press the SHIFT and DROP buttons.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Unpack Take Folder to New Tracks ⌃⇧⌘U – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Unpack Take Folder to New Tracks    ⌃⇧⌘U

“Comping” using “takes” is an alien concept to me. I grew up in a world of live performance. The only “takes” I know about are the many (many, many) times I would practice a piece of music in order to perform it flawlessly when time to play.

It’s a brave new world. Saves a lot of time. Probably gets a better product.

Record multiple audio takes – Logic Pro X

When you’re recording, you can record multiple versions, or takes, of a phrase or section in quick succession. Take recording can be helpful especially when you’re improvising a lead or solo part and want to capture several versions while you’re feeling inspired.

 

 

Unpack take folders – Logic Pro X

You can unpack take folders using the original channel strip for all new tracks, or you can unpack take folders using different channel strips for each new track. Both methods replace the selected take folder—or take folders—with new audio tracks for each take and each comp. You can also unpack take folders to new track alternatives, which keeps all the takes on the same track, but as separate track alternatives. The first audio track or track alternative reflects the active comp, followed by the takes and remaining comps in the order they appear in the take folder’s pop-up menu.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

The 7 Steps of Ideal Mic Placement — SonicScoop

The 7 Steps of Ideal Mic Placement — SonicScoop

Wessel Oltheten, producer, engineer and author of the book Mixing with Impact offers a roadmap to getting better sounds out of your mics, every time. For even more on this subject, look for his new in-depth series on placing mics, starting next month on SonicScoop.

Getting the ideal mic placement means making important decisions before you even move the mic. Here are 7 steps to getting better results in any context.

1. Guess—but don’t just guess.

I start by placing every microphone at the spot where I think the odds are best for it to work well.

Microphone Off Axis Sound – How Does It Affect The Sound? | Production Expert

Posted by Julian Rodgers – Pro Tools Expert

Microphone Off Axis Sound – How Does It Affect The Sound? | Production Expert

I’ve been accused of audio heresy in the past because I’m not a fan of the SM57. It’s a useful mic on guitars but I avoid them on snare drums because of their off axis sound, which I find colours the hi hat in an unpleasant way. In this article we will look at a couple of examples, including the SM57 on snare and offer some thoughts not just about why this happens but why it matters.

Drum Overheads – A Stereo Pair Or Cymbal Spot Mics? | Production Expert

Drum Overheads – A Stereo Pair Or Cymbal Spot Mics? | Production Expert

In a recent conversation among the team we were discussing what the thinking was behind the apparently common practice of using a spaced pair of cardioid mics, often facing inwards, as a pair of overheads on drums? If the idea of a pair of overheads is to capture a stereo picture of the whole kit, rather than be cymbal mics, then exactly what is this arrangement trying to achieve and where does it come from?

Good examples of how to capture a drum kit. Lots of examples and clear discussion.

6 Tips for Recording Interviews in the Field

6 Tips for Recording Interviews in the Field

by Nick Messitte, iZotope Contributor July 1, 2019

6 tips to get the most out of your next interview or tape sync project.
Recently, I stepped away from my mixing duties to report a piece for WHYY, an NPR station based out of Philadelphia. The gig got me out of the studio, recording interviews in a variety of locations, and dusting off a bag of in-the-field tricks that might be of some benefit to you.

If this sort of work intrigues you—interviewing people in the field for radio and podcasts and the like—read on. We’ll cover the right tools for the job and some good techniques for getting a quality sound.

Classical Music: Recording, Mixing, and Mastering Fundamentals

Classical Music: Recording, Mixing, and Mastering Fundamentals

by Jett Galindo, iZotope Contributor July 3, 2019

Recording, mixing, and mastering classical music requires different techniques than most modern productions.
Classical music is known for its nuanced sonics—from the wide dynamics all the way to its vast range in the frequency spectrum. With that comes a unique set of challenges for sound engineers when recording, mixing, and mastering classical music.

Deep Dive Into Smart Tempo (& Quantize Tracks Not Recorded to a Click)

Why Logic Pro Rules

Deep Dive Into Smart Tempo (& Quantize Tracks Not Recorded to a Click)

Unfamiliar with Smart Tempo? It’s only the best thing to happen to musicians who don’t want to play like a robot to a click track.