Power to the People: Simple DIY Mastering with Ozone

Power to the People: Simple DIY Mastering with Ozone

by Jett Galindo, iZotope Contributor June 29, 2020

Today’s innovations in music technology have empowered everyday creators to explore more complex production techniques. One thing, however, has remained a seemingly intimidating task for many: mastering. To the non-mastering engineer, it’s a discipline still shrouded in mystery, with many “how-to” resources overwhelming the everyday reader with technical jargon and difficult-to-digest techniques. And within the fast-growing DIY community, there still lies the challenge of not having easy access to state-of-the-art listening environments or professional mastering studios.

The 10 Most Used Chord Progressions in Pop and Rock and Roll | Thinking in Music

The 10 Most Used Chord Progressions in Pop and Rock and Roll | Thinking in Music

This text is entirely a “quote” from the above website.

Number one is the Don’t Stop Believing Progression, I – V – vi – IV (G – D – Em – C). The Axis of Awesome did a great bit about this one in which they play 40 songs in a row that all have the same progression including, No Woman No Cry, Let It Be, I’m Yours, etc… and over the past few years, that list has become a lot longer!

The second is the 50’s Progression, I – vi – IV – V (G – Em – C – D). I call it this because it was hugely popular in the 50’s and 60’s and is still used today. Notably used recently by Justin Bieber for “Baby” (Justin was like baby baby baby oh… what a pity) and Sean Kingston for “Beautiful Girls,” though Kingston really just ripped Ben E. King’s “Stand By Me” off.

The third is the Canon, I – V – vi – iii – IV – I – IV – V (G – D – Em – Bm – C – G – C – D). It was the chord progression used by Pachelbel for his Canon in D (not G as above). The piece, forgotten soon after it was written (around 1694), was rediscovered in the early 20th century and has influenced a number of songwriters. It is, however, simply an extension of the basic I – IV – V – I progression that was used by nearly every composer for hundreds of years up to about 100 years ago.

The fourth is the Blues Progression, I – I – I – I – IV – IV – I – I – V – V – I – I (G – G – G – G – C – C – G – G – D – D – G – G). This is the way Chuck Berry played it in Johnny B Goode though the last 4 chords are often V – VI – I – V (D – C – G – D). There are 12 chords because it follows the standard 12-bar blues progression. In this progression it’s common to switch freely between major and minor. This progression has been used in thousands of songs outside of the blues from Cream’s Sunshine Of Your Love to Tracy Chapman’s Give Me One Reason and beyond.

The fifth is the Smoke on the Water Progression, ii – IV – V (am – C – D). It’s usually used as part of a larger progression and was used in Purple Haze, Iron Man, House of the Rising Sun, Stepping Stone, etc…

The sixth is the Good Love Progression, I – IV – V – IV (G – C – D – C). This was used in Wild Thing, La Bamba, and Good Love, etc.

The Seventh is the Sweet Home Progression… (god, how I hate Sweet Home Alabama!) V – IV – I (D – C – G). Can’t Explain, Sweet Child of Mine.

The Eighth is a rearrangement of the Don’t Stop Believing progression vi – IV – I – V (em – C – G – D). I’m not sure what to call this one. The song that always gets stuck in my head with this one is The Red Hot Chili Pepper’s Snow, though I know Taylor Swift uses it in at least three songs (as well as most of the other progressions above…), Green Day used it in Holiday, and The Cranberries used it in Zombie, just to name a few.

The ninth is the stereotypical Descending Flamenco Progression  vi – V – IV – III (em – D – C – B (not Bm!)). This one has been used in songs from California Dreamin to Stray Cat Strut… I’m sure you can think of a few more! A variation on this is vi – V – VI – V (em – D – C – D) which arguably may be more popular today…

And the tenth that I see is the As My Guitar Gently Weeps Progression. This one straddles two keys and it’s basic representation is ii – I – V6 – bVII (- VI) (am – G – D/f# – F (- E)). It looks like a variation on the Descending Flamenco Progression and is presented with slight variations by everyone that uses it. The Beatles actually substituted an am7/G  for the G chord and left out the E. Chicago, in 25 or 6 to 4 focused on the root notes in the bass -> A – G – F# – F – E. Led Zepplin, Green Day, and Neil Young all offered their variations as well.

6 Ways To Use Neutron 3 In Post Production Workflows | Production Expert

6 Ways To Use Neutron 3 In Post Production Workflows | Production Expert

In this article, iZotope contributor Nick Messitte demonstrates how Neutron can be an excellent companion during the post-production process when mixing sound for film, television, and other viewable media. The tools in Neutron are designed so that they can be transparent in timbre, which is perfect for post-production. Let’s dive right into it and show off six tips for using Neutron 3 for post-production.

The first three caught my eye. Need to get this article open while doing my critical listens this week…

3 EQ Plugins To Give Your Sound Some Real Flavour – Do You Have Them In Your Tool Box? | Production Expert

3 EQ Plugins To Give Your Sound Some Real Flavour – Do You Have Them In Your Tool Box? | Production Expert

In the early days of recording an engineer had to work with what they had, often in the form of a console with its own character such as a Neve or SSL mixer. However, in modern recording with plugins there are almost limitless options for both corrective and characterful EQ.

1962 BBC Training Manual | Martin Mitchell’s Microphones

1962 BBC Training Manual | Martin Mitchell’s Microphones

In the 1951 BBC Microphones training manual we saw that the corporation functioned with a small selection of British manufactured microphones, most of which had been in service since the 1930’s.  So when I saw this Manual from 1962 I was curious to see how ‘Auntie’ had moved on into the swinging sixties.

The microphone layouts for orchestra and “dance bands” are outstanding.

What a neat resource.

Use The Waves Scheps Omni Channel To Mix Fast Completely In The Box | Production Expert

Use The Waves Scheps Omni Channel To Mix Fast Completely In The Box | Production Expert

In this free 4 part tutorial series, brought to you with the kind support of Waves, we show you how you can tackle a live band mix quickly using Waves Scheps Omni Channel plug-in. Watch to see and hear how this channel strip differs from more traditional console emulations and generic modular based channel strips. Scheps Omni’s secret sauce is found in both its flexibility and sonic performance which harness some of the best bits of working with analog gear and digital workflows.

I like the Omni Channel for exploring. Works in all the DAWs and I can use it with SoundSource and AudioHijack.

How Can a Pro Tools User Wrestle Logic Into Creating a Time-Stamped Mono Audio File – The Hidden Secrets of Bouncing vs Exporting | Logic Pro

How Can a Pro Tools User Wrestle Logic Into Creating a Time-Stamped Mono Audio File – The Hidden Secrets of Bouncing vs Exporting | Logic Pro

Bounce which is easy will always create stereo files even if the file I want to export is mono.

Pro De-Esser Tips for Better Sounding Vocals – Produce Like A Pro

Pro De-Esser Tips for Better Sounding Vocals – Produce Like A Pro

Manual de-essing means grabbing all the sibilant parts of a vocal and clip-gaining them down. If this sounds ridiculous and annoying, it is, but it’s totally worth it the hassle. When you take the time to go over edits like this, the result can sound much more natural “automatic” de-essers.

I love these folks. Such useful information just because…

How to create ambient shimmer pads in Logic Pro X – MusicTech

How to create ambient shimmer pads in Logic Pro X – MusicTech

An intriguing way of routing audio plug-ins can unlock a world of ambient ‘shimmer’ pad effects that’s quite unlike traditional sound creation methods.
Mark Cousins

Skim | SourceForge.net

Skim download | SourceForge.net

Skim is a PDF reader and note-taker for OS X. It is designed to help you read and annotate scientific papers in PDF, but is also great for viewing any PDF file. Skim requires Mac OS X 10.6 or higher.

I have used Skim for a while (years) but not very heavily. I always wanted a way to share annotations with PDF files in Preview just because it’s the default reader.

I have decided for the time being that Skim will be my default reader/annotator. Why? Search works very well compared to the anemic (and sometimes broken) search in Preview.

Search the “Logic Pro X User Guide” for ‘add a control point’. In Preview we get the words found on 47 pages. In Skim we get the 5 locations where the string occurs. That’s exactly what I want.

Bookmarks in Skim can be session-only, or remembered. Very handy.

The multi-pane window interface – table of contents on the left (or search results) and annotations on the right, with separate search criteria. Document remains in the middle. Very much like the interface in Scrivener, which I use for all of my notebooks and workbooks.

Now if I could get Scrivener to open PDF files in Skim I would be happy. In the interim I have created a script and assigned it to a key command that will open the Preview document in Skim for me.

I feel like I have accomplished something useful today.

Cocoa Text System

Cocoa Text System

Apple’s Cocoa text system is a complicated beast, but also extremely flexible, and with a bit of work, it can be molded to match many working styles. This how-to covers the 2 major ways of customizing the text input system: Default key bindings, and for still more control, input managers.

This is fundamental knowledge for Mac users who type on keyboards. With luck many of the default rules apply to iOS as well.

I have been using the Emacs key-bindings since 1975…

Compression: When and How to Use It in Nectar, Neutron, and Ozone

‘[Compression: When and How to Use It in Nectar, Neutron, and Ozone](https://www.izotope.com/en/learn/compression-how-to-use-it-in-nectar-neutron-and-ozone.html?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=Compression_Nectar_Neutron_Ozone)’

Compression: When and How to Use It in Nectar, Neutron, and Ozone

In previous articles, we covered different types of hardware compressors and why their behavior matters in this hybrid/digital world. We also covered typical mistakes engineers make in using compression. This article expounds on compression in a specific way: we are diving into the various compressors available in the iZotope ecosystem and relating them to real-world applications.

by Nick Messitte, iZotope Contributor December 9, 2019

Q. When should I use mono reverb as opposed to stereo reverb?

Q. When should I use mono reverb as opposed to stereo reverb?

Another nifty trick for chart-targeted pop and EDM productions is to widen a reverb effect until it gives that ‘outside the speakers’ illusion, and then use just a small amount of it to expand the apparent width of your mix as a whole. Although such a reverb will have such dreadful mono-compatibility that it may pretty much vanish in mono, that’s rarely a great loss in practice, because the reverb serves no musical function. Better to lose some reverb in mono, than an important musical line!

Mike Senior, “Sound on Sound”

Freeware Of The Week #27 | Mike Senior on Patreon

Freeware Of The Week #27 | Mike Senior on Patreon

However, the freakiest of the lot comes courtesy of Melda, in the form of their MFreeformPhase plug-in, which allows completely variable frequency-selective phase adjustment via an EQ-like graphical interface. So, for example, if you don’t like what comb-filtering is doing to the low midrange, you can adjust the phase relationships there without affecting the rest of the spectrum.

Frequency Phase Alignment…

Meta Messages In Logic

Meta Messages In Logic

In addition to standard MIDI messages, Logic uses two special message types to carry out certain operations and to communicate among its various components. In the Logic Notes column in SOS December 2002 we had a look at Fader messages, which are used for track-based automation. Here we’ll examine Meta messages, which have several functions within Logic. One thing to keep in mind as you read this is that these special message types only travel within Logic — they never venture down the MIDI pipeline to confuse your gear or other MIDI applications.

The Wayback Machine takes us to 2003 to get a description of Meta messages and what the are good for in Logic – even today, sixteen years later…