Drum Mixing With Logic Pro X Plug-Ins Only – Two Approaches To The Same Tracks | Logic Pro

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Drum Mixing With Logic Pro X Plug-Ins Only – Two Approaches To The Same Tracks | Logic Pro

Chris Vandeviver and Eli Krantzenberg have been doing a series of collaborative videos. We each tackle the same situation, from two distinct vantage points and approaches. These posts are designed as a vehicle to demonstrate just how flexible Logic Pro X is, and the sometimes dramatically different results that are achieved by two people using the same tools.

Fundamental Stereo Miking Techniques – Produce Like A Pro

Fundamental Stereo Miking Techniques – Produce Like A Pro

Stereo miking techniques use two microphones at the same time to record one sound source. Each microphone is then panned to the left and to the right to mimic the way our ears perceive sound in the “real world.” This adds width, space, and location to a recording.

Zoom Meetings with OBS an iPhone and a green screen

Zoom Meetings with OBS an iPhone and a green screen

With the Covid-19 situation in the spring of 2020, the University of Arizona, along with a lot of the country, sent us all home to work. Quickly our lives turned into hopping from Zoom meeting to Zoom meeting, with the oddball Teams, Slack, Skype, WebEx, Chime, BlueJeans… who am I missing?

6 Ways to Use Neutron 3 for Post Production

6 Ways to Use Neutron 3 for Post Production

by Nick Messitte, iZotope Contributor

By now, you’re probably familiar with the ways Neutron 3 can help you in your mixes. This article will demonstrate how Neutron is also a perfect companion during the post production process—mixing sound for film, television, and other viewable media. The tools in Neutron are often transparent in timbre, which is perfect for post production. Let’s dive right into it and show off six tips for using Neutron 3 for post production.

It’s not just for post-production anymore…de-reverb?

Remix FX performance recording in Logic Pro X 10.5 – 9to5Mac

Remix FX performance recording in Logic Pro X 10.5 – 9to5Mac

Now housed inside Logic Pro X, the Remix FX plug-in brings more than just a few DJ tricks to Apple’s flagship production suite. To some degree overshadowed by the influx of game-changing new tools and technologies that hit Logic Pro X with the 10.5 update, the multi-FX, touch control plug-in rig can be a particularly useful and creative production tool that only enhances new powerhouse additions like Sampler and Live Loops. Below we are exploring its capabilities and how Logic Pro X users can take advantage of the immersive touch-based musical performance surface.

5 Ear Training Exercises to Listen Like a Mastering Engineer

5 Ear Training Exercises to Listen Like a Mastering Engineer

by Ian Stewart, iZotope Contributor August 12, 2020

When you think of the most important tool in a mastering engineer’s arsenal, what comes to mind? An equalizer? A compressor? Top-notch conversion, monitoring, or room acoustics? These are all certainly very important, but without a great set of ears behind them, they’re virtually worthless.

But in truth, your ears are only really one part of the story. They turn sound vibrations in the air into neurological signals, but it’s your brain that does the real hearing. Luckily, our brains are great at learning and adapting, so here are five ear (and brain) training tips to help you listen like a mastering engineer.

How Inter-plugin Communication Shows up in Your Workflow – iZotope

How Inter-plugin Communication Shows up in Your Workflow

by Will Hunt, Product Marketing Manager January 16, 2020

We talk about Inter-plugin Communication in our products, but what does it actually mean? It is not one single feature, but a framework that lets iZotope plug-ins work as a team to help you accomplish common mix tasks that professional engineers tackle on the job every day. In this article, I’ll use the Tonal Balance Bundle to demonstrate ways iZotope plug-ins use this framework to streamline common mixing tasks.

How To Use UA Console With Zoom Or Any Remote Application – Free Tutorial | Production Expert

How To Use UA Console With Zoom Or Any Remote Application – Free Tutorial | Production Expert

In this article Mike Exeter gets to grips with UA Console and looks in detail at how to set up your system for streaming and collaborative workflows online. Console has loopback capabilities but they are presented rather differently and a little explanation makes things much simpler. We have the details.

How to perform with Live Loops in Logic Pro X 10.5: a step-by-step guide

How to perform with Live Loops in Logic Pro X 10.5: a step-by-step guide

Though they’re terrific for transforming studio-based productions, Live Loops are equally powerful when used for live performance. We demonstrate how this effective feature can take tracks from the studio to the stage.
Mark Cousins – MusicTech

Best Logic Pro Launchpad grid controllers for Live Loops – 9to5Mac

Best Logic Pro Launchpad grid controllers for Live Loops – 9to5Mac

It’s time to take full control of Apple’s latest production technologies with Novation’s Live Loops and Logic Pro Launchpad grid controllers. The Live Loops grid-based environment is a wonderful experience with a connected iPad, allowing for a more immersive approach to your cells via the Logic Remote app. But Live Loops also brings with it official support for a wide range of those colorful and affordable grid controllers from Novation. For compatible models, functionality details, and more, hit the jump.

FREE Piano Recording Techniques – Get A Great Piano Sound | Production Expert

FREE Piano Recording Techniques – Get A Great Piano Sound | Production Expert

In this series, we are going to look at how to record a wide range of sound sources from a solo vocal through guitars, bass, piano strings, brass woodwind and percussion, before moving onto the drum kit. In part 5 we are going to look at recording a piano.

How to capture live drums with Studio One: a step-by-step guide

 

How to capture live drums with Studio One: a step-by-step guide

Learn how to lay down a rhythmic foundation for your Studio One projects by capturing live drums – even if you’ve only a few mics to hand.

Power to the People: Simple DIY Mastering with Ozone

Power to the People: Simple DIY Mastering with Ozone

by Jett Galindo, iZotope Contributor June 29, 2020

Today’s innovations in music technology have empowered everyday creators to explore more complex production techniques. One thing, however, has remained a seemingly intimidating task for many: mastering. To the non-mastering engineer, it’s a discipline still shrouded in mystery, with many “how-to” resources overwhelming the everyday reader with technical jargon and difficult-to-digest techniques. And within the fast-growing DIY community, there still lies the challenge of not having easy access to state-of-the-art listening environments or professional mastering studios.

The 10 Most Used Chord Progressions in Pop and Rock and Roll | Thinking in Music

The 10 Most Used Chord Progressions in Pop and Rock and Roll | Thinking in Music

This text is entirely a “quote” from the above website.

Number one is the Don’t Stop Believing Progression, I – V – vi – IV (G – D – Em – C). The Axis of Awesome did a great bit about this one in which they play 40 songs in a row that all have the same progression including, No Woman No Cry, Let It Be, I’m Yours, etc… and over the past few years, that list has become a lot longer!

The second is the 50’s Progression, I – vi – IV – V (G – Em – C – D). I call it this because it was hugely popular in the 50’s and 60’s and is still used today. Notably used recently by Justin Bieber for “Baby” (Justin was like baby baby baby oh… what a pity) and Sean Kingston for “Beautiful Girls,” though Kingston really just ripped Ben E. King’s “Stand By Me” off.

The third is the Canon, I – V – vi – iii – IV – I – IV – V (G – D – Em – Bm – C – G – C – D). It was the chord progression used by Pachelbel for his Canon in D (not G as above). The piece, forgotten soon after it was written (around 1694), was rediscovered in the early 20th century and has influenced a number of songwriters. It is, however, simply an extension of the basic I – IV – V – I progression that was used by nearly every composer for hundreds of years up to about 100 years ago.

The fourth is the Blues Progression, I – I – I – I – IV – IV – I – I – V – V – I – I (G – G – G – G – C – C – G – G – D – D – G – G). This is the way Chuck Berry played it in Johnny B Goode though the last 4 chords are often V – VI – I – V (D – C – G – D). There are 12 chords because it follows the standard 12-bar blues progression. In this progression it’s common to switch freely between major and minor. This progression has been used in thousands of songs outside of the blues from Cream’s Sunshine Of Your Love to Tracy Chapman’s Give Me One Reason and beyond.

The fifth is the Smoke on the Water Progression, ii – IV – V (am – C – D). It’s usually used as part of a larger progression and was used in Purple Haze, Iron Man, House of the Rising Sun, Stepping Stone, etc…

The sixth is the Good Love Progression, I – IV – V – IV (G – C – D – C). This was used in Wild Thing, La Bamba, and Good Love, etc.

The Seventh is the Sweet Home Progression… (god, how I hate Sweet Home Alabama!) V – IV – I (D – C – G). Can’t Explain, Sweet Child of Mine.

The Eighth is a rearrangement of the Don’t Stop Believing progression vi – IV – I – V (em – C – G – D). I’m not sure what to call this one. The song that always gets stuck in my head with this one is The Red Hot Chili Pepper’s Snow, though I know Taylor Swift uses it in at least three songs (as well as most of the other progressions above…), Green Day used it in Holiday, and The Cranberries used it in Zombie, just to name a few.

The ninth is the stereotypical Descending Flamenco Progression  vi – V – IV – III (em – D – C – B (not Bm!)). This one has been used in songs from California Dreamin to Stray Cat Strut… I’m sure you can think of a few more! A variation on this is vi – V – VI – V (em – D – C – D) which arguably may be more popular today…

And the tenth that I see is the As My Guitar Gently Weeps Progression. This one straddles two keys and it’s basic representation is ii – I – V6 – bVII (- VI) (am – G – D/f# – F (- E)). It looks like a variation on the Descending Flamenco Progression and is presented with slight variations by everyone that uses it. The Beatles actually substituted an am7/G  for the G chord and left out the E. Chicago, in 25 or 6 to 4 focused on the root notes in the bass -> A – G – F# – F – E. Led Zepplin, Green Day, and Neil Young all offered their variations as well.

6 Ways To Use Neutron 3 In Post Production Workflows | Production Expert

6 Ways To Use Neutron 3 In Post Production Workflows | Production Expert

In this article, iZotope contributor Nick Messitte demonstrates how Neutron can be an excellent companion during the post-production process when mixing sound for film, television, and other viewable media. The tools in Neutron are designed so that they can be transparent in timbre, which is perfect for post-production. Let’s dive right into it and show off six tips for using Neutron 3 for post-production.

The first three caught my eye. Need to get this article open while doing my critical listens this week…