Copy Selected Regions to Focused Track – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Copy Selected Regions to Focused Track

Can’t seem to locate any particular documentation. Experimentation says I should select a track to establish focus then select regions (shift-click), the Copy Selected Regions to Focused Track.

I’m not really sure of how this fits into a workflow.

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Catch Playhead Position ` – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Catch Playhead Position    `

That’s not a speck of dust on the screen – it’s the backquote – on the tilde key.

Toggles the “Catch Playhead” button and stops scrolling or catches up depending on the state.

If regions are scrolling along with the playhead during playback you can stop the scrolling, perform some task, and then catch back up.

I need to learn more about how the playhead works in the windows other than Arrange.

Catch preferences – Logic Pro X

 

Control how windows change as the playhead moves – Logic Pro X

You can control how windows update to reflect changes to the playhead position using Catch modes. When you work in Catch mode, the visible section of a window follows the playhead during playback or recording.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Trim Region End to Previous Transient ⌃[ – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Trim Region End to Previous Transient    ⌃[

Shorten the region by moving its end to the previous transient (closest on the left).

Trim audio regions in the Audio Track Editor – Logic Pro X

 

You can trim an audio region in the Audio Track Editor to remove part of the beginning or end of the region.

 

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Command    Key Touch Bar
- Main Window Tracks
Trim Region End to Next Region ⇧\
Trim Region Start to Previous Region
Trim Regions to Fill within Locators ⌥\
Trim Region Start to Previous Transient ⌃⇧[
Trim Region Start to Next Transient ⌃⇧]
Trim Region End to Previous Transient ⌃[
Trim Region End to Next Transient ⌃]

Go to End – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Go to End

Move the playhead to the end of the project. Compare this to “Go to End of Last Region – ⌥↩” which moves the playhead to the end of the last region. You can toggle between the beginning of the project ‘↩’ and the end of the last region with ‘⌥↩’.

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Show/Hide Score Editor N – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Show/Hide Score Editor    N

Toggles the Score Editor window. I think I would be more likely to leave the Score Editor open in a screenset and just swap those. I don’t do a lot with scoring at this time.

The toggle opens and closes the score editor at the bottom of the arrange window. Having that open with a single track makes some sense. If the score editor is the only window open toggle will create a full screen score editor. Odd.

Logic is one of the programs on the Mac that doesn’t “play nice” with window management.

Notation overview – Logic Pro X

You can view MIDI regions in software instrument (and external MIDI instrument) tracks as music notation in the Score Editor. Notes and other musical events are displayed as standard notation, along with common symbols such as time and key signature, bar lines, and clef signs. You can add and edit notes, add sustain pedal markings and other symbols, and print the score.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

The Subtle Art of Pitch Correction | Universal Audio

The Subtle Art of Pitch Correction | Universal Audio

Mix engineers today are asked to do far more than simply mix the song. In fact, it’s now expected that they clean the tracks, eliminate pops and clicks, adjust the track timing, and replace or augment some of the sounds as well. Another job that falls to many mix engineers today is correcting the pitch of any track that needs it. This process is faster and easier than ever, but like anything else, you still need good fundamental technique to seamlessly pull it off.

Some advice on pitch correction from Bobby Owsinski.

Audio Compression Basics | Universal Audio

Audio Compression Basics | Universal Audio

Compressors and limiters are used to reduce dynamic range — the span between the softest and loudest sounds. Using compression can make your tracks sound more polished by controlling maximum levels and maintaining higher average loudness. Here are some compression basics, different compression types, and some tips to try on your tracks.

Mason Hicks does an excellent job of describing compression, compressors, and why do it at all.

Note that the stock compressor in Logic Pro X can be used for each of the compressor types – tube, optical, FET, and VCA. The “Platinum” compressor in Logic is really none of the types listed, maybe more like a Distressor?

Mixing in Stereo: Adding Width and Depth to Your Recordings | Universal Audio

Mixing in Stereo: Adding Width and Depth to Your Recordings | Universal Audio

When it comes to discussing the fine art of mixing music, I tend to approach the subject with some trepidation. After all, compared to many of the topics I’ve written about, this one is rife with subjectivity — one person’s idea of a great sounding mix may be another’s sonic nightmare. And what works for one genre of music will be decidedly wrong for another.But all those variables aside, there are at least a few general theories, tips, and tricks that apply to most mix projects. So while the idea here is not to give a step-by-step tutorial on two-track mixing, hopefully we can cover at least a few concepts that are useful for everyone.

Daniel Keller’s mixing techniques. The images showing mic placement have decent starting points. The loudness contour frequency chart is especially useful. 

Consider this panning of instruments as a preset…

Blog studio basics mixing stereo feat 1 2x

Ready, Set, Mix! Tips for Prepping Your Mixing Session | Universal Audio

Ready, Set, Mix! Tips for Prepping Your Mixing Session | Universal Audio

It’s time to mix, so let’s start to move some faders! Well, maybe not right away. If we really want a mix to go quickly and smoothly, there’s some preparation that needs to be done beforehand. Although many great mixers aren’t conscious about exactly how they’re going about prepping for a mix, they all cover basically the same areas: technical prep, session prep, and personal prep. Let’s take a look at each.

Excellent advice from Bobby Owsinksi.

Toggle Track Solo – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Toggle Track Solo

Toggles the Solo state of the selected track(s) on and off.

Solo tracks – Logic Pro X

You can solo a track, silencing all tracks that are not also soloed. Soloing tracks is useful when you want to work on a track individually, or work on a few tracks, without hearing the other tracks in the project.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

A Guide to Bussing in a Mix (+ Processing Tips) — Pro Audio Files

A Guide to Bussing in a Mix (+ Processing Tips) — Pro Audio Files

Separating instruments into mix groups is an essential part of audio production. Processing audio at the buss level, rather than with inserts on individual tracks, can not only lead to a more efficient workflow but also help productions shine in a natural and very musical way.

6 Strategies for Taming Midrange in a Busy Mix — Pro Audio Files

6 Strategies for Taming Midrange in a Busy Mix — Pro Audio Files

Achieving a well-balanced midrange in a recording is one of the biggest challenges of mixing. Beginning producers especially tend to struggle in this area. The ranges of many instruments overlap quite a bit, and some negotiation will always be necessary to help them share space in a mix. Muddy room resonances only complicate things further. When we have a session with a busy arrangement and high track count — a pretty common occurrence in digital recording — midrange problems can multiply out of control.

Snap Automation Mode: 1/16 Triplet (1/24) – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Snap Automation Mode: 1/16 Triplet (1/24)

Automating performance characteristics is something I wanted in 1990. Seeing a 1/16th triplet describe as a 1/24th note is intriguing, but only because it makes sense when trying to regularize time for performance. What would  1/24th note look like?

Snap automation to grid positions – Logic Pro X

You can snap track automation to grid positions. You can choose if you want automation to automatically use the division value chosen in the Snap menu, or you can choose a different snap value for automation.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

1/128 Note 8 – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  1/128 Note    8

Set the default note duration to a 1/128th note. Kind of overkill? I’ve seen and played 1/64th notes but 1/128?It isn’t even shown on the keyboard 😉

Use step input recording techniques – Logic Pro X

Step input allows you to insert MIDI notes when you’re not recording in real time. You can use step input to create note runs that may be too fast for you to play or to replicate sheet music that’s too difficult for you to play.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Extend Track Selection Down ⇧↓ – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Extend Track Selection Down    ⇧↓

Add the next track (below the currently selected one) to the selection. I normally do this by selecting a track, holding down the shift key, and clicking on the next track(s) to be added to the selection.

Full control of the application from the keyboard makes a lot of sense for a “hands on” scenario. On laptops with trackpads it might make less sense – the trackpad becomes a very big surface for manipulation.

I have worked with extended keyboards for many decades. I am used to the keypad. I should try using the smaller keyboard.

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND