Add, remove, and edit key commands in Logic Remote on iPhone – Apple Support

Add, remove, and edit key commands in Logic Remote on iPhone – Apple Support

After you turn on key command editing, you can add, remove, move, and customize key commands to suit your own workflow needs. You can also organize key commands by color.

The default commands in Logic Remote are numerous, and not very interesting for my work. I need to create a set of commands. I will start by removing some.

Tap the Settings icon (gear) at the top right of the display. Choose ‘Edit Key Commands’. Edit/Move/Delete as desired. Tap ‘Done’.

When searching for commands I can press the microphone button on the search field and speak the command.

I was inspired by going through the complete Groove3 tutorial for Logic Remote.

Logic Remote Explained® – Groove3.com Video Tutorial

Logic Pro X wiz Doug Zangar brings you in-depth Logic Remote video tutorials! Learn everything you need to know to use the free iOS Logic Remote app to control your Logic Pro X projects, including the new Live Loops, Remix FX, Touch Instruments and more. These videos are designed for both new and experienced Logic Remote users.

Control Multiple Instruments on Different MIDI Channels – Logic Pro Help

Control Multiple Instruments on Different MIDI Channels – Logic Pro Help

Controlling multiple instruments on different MIDI channels in Logic is easy, and it does not require you to ever open the environment! It also allows you to record different controller keyboards on different software instrument or external MIDI tracks. Whether you’re trying to use an external sequencer (like an MPC 2000, or even another computer running Logic) to trigger instruments within Logic, or whether you’re simply trying to play different instruments using different MIDI controllers, read on.

Mackie Control Global View buttons in Logic Pro – Apple Support

Mackie Control Global View buttons in Logic Pro – Apple Support

The GLOBAL VIEW button is used in conjunction with the other eight GLOBAL VIEW buttons to display (and edit) specific types of channel strips. Pressing any of the buttons activates All View; when this view is active, the green LED to the right of the GLOBAL VIEW button is lit.

I have become fond of using ‘Single’ view in the mixer. If I select one of my summing stacks and switch to ‘Single’ I get the AUX and all of the channels visible in the mixer windows and in the faders on the X-Touch.

I haven’t been able to find documentation on how to switch the X-Touch into ‘Single’ view. Pressing the ‘Global View’ button toggles between ‘Arrange’ (tracks) and ‘All’.

After much experimentation I have discovered the OPTION-GLOBAL VIEW button press. This switches the mixer to ‘Single’ view. Excellent!

Mapping Remix FX to Launchpad in Logic Pro – 9to5Mac

Mapping Remix FX to Launchpad in Logic Pro – 9to5Mac

Considering how simple it is to download Logic Remote for free and use your iPhone as a sort of always-on, heads-up display, solely for Remix FX, alongside your Launchpad, I’m still not sure any of this is worth the trouble anyway. As much as I would like to have this one, single Logic Pro controller instrument in front me that I can completely master, and ignore as much of everything else as possible, Launchpad’s touch-button toggles and faders just don’t seem to be able to keep up with Apple’s remote multi-touch screen control. I get it, with Logic Remote you can be flipping and waving your fingers across the iPad, automatically and simultaneously engaging and adjusting various FX with immersive touch and swipe movements. And it all just works immediately and always with no mapping needed.

Copy to Live Loops: Transforming regions into cells in Logic Pro – 9to5Mac

Copy to Live Loops: Transforming regions into cells in Logic Pro – 9to5Mac

Today we are taking a look at the copy to Live Loops function and transforming your regions into cells. While we previously explored some of the more performance-based applications of Launchpads and Live Loops, arguably the most obvious use for Apple’s grid-based production environment is in arrangement. You can easily and quickly experiment with transitions from one part to any other without having to start dragging and dropping huge, unwieldy chunks of regions around. Sure, that’s nothing some Marquee tool or skip/cycle wizardry can’t handle on the regular timeline, but there’s really no comparing that to the musical immediacy and hands-on immersion of triggering these sections with a single Launchpad button, all-synced to the timeline and without having to commit to anything until you’ve experienced the change.