Open System Performance…  – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Open System Performance…


Opens the performance meters. Typically I get to this window by double-clicking on the performance meter in the control bar.

System overload alerts in Logic Pro X – Apple Support:

Use the meters in the Logic Pro CPU/HD window to monitor system performance while working on a project. To view the CPU/HD window:

1. Choose View > Customize Control Bar and Display.

2. Choose Custom from the pop-up menu in the LCD section.

3. Select the Load Meters (CPU/HD) checkbox, then click OK.

4.A CPU/HD meter appears on the right side of the LCD. Double-click the CPU meter to open it in a new, expanded window.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Lesson 2 Recording Audio – Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Music Production

Lesson 2 Recording Audio – Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Music Production:

In this lesson, you will configure Logic for audio recording and study activities you will typically perform when working with live musicians: recording a single instrument, recording additional takes of the same instrument, cycle recording, multitrack recording, punching on the fly, and automatic punching.

Next up in the course. I will go ahead and plug in the guitar and work through the tuning exercise, along with some comping. It’s not something that I would normally do (guitar), but I have one…so…

A Little Help From Your Friends

The story starts with me wanting to get more in-depth knowledge of “Project Audio”. I started by looking at a used Logic Pro 9 book – the one that is used for the Apple Certification course – “Logic Pro 9 and Logic Express 9 – Professional Audio Production”. All through the book there are references to the resources contained on the DVD that came with the book. Sigh. Used book, no DVD. Hunt for online copy. I wound up at PeachPit Press staring at a place where I could use ‘Safari On Line’ to read the book. This really didn’t help much.

Ding. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has online books and courses available to members. I have maintained my membership since the early 1980s. I haven’t had much use for the computing and database courses that I used to access. The coursework uses the “Safari Learning Platform” to help us move forward. This might be the same “Safari On Line” that I was staring at over at PeachPit.

I logged in to the platform and searched for the book, and found “Logic Pro X 10.4 – Apple Pro Training Series: Professional Audio Production”. Excellent. I started reading and came to the section about downloading course-related resources. Followed a not-too-clear path to get access to the download (ISBN number, answer the question to show that I have the book). Download the files. Good to go.

I don’t really want to do this using a web browser while I am trying to run Logic Pro X, so I figured out how to get the O’Reilly reading app onto my iPad. Perfect. I can read my book on the iPad and work on the screen with Logic Pro X.

I started at the beginning, followed all the steps, turned on “Quick Help” which pops up little help balloons as the mouse hovers over a tool. Yes. I have done this before. There is a little hint at the bottom that says “Type command-/ to get more info”. That brings up the help document – very slow. Then I read this…

“To go further, read the Logic Pro Help documentation within the free Logic Remote iPad app. The documentation automatically displays the section relevant to the Logic Pro X area where you place the mouse pointer”

Whoa! Hmmm. Now I need another iPad to see what they mean. We happen to have kept an older iPad as a resource. I am in luck.

Install “Logic Remote” on the iPad, follow a couple of helpful hints in the app, and there it is. The iPad is showing me the details from the help documentation. The very same help resource that I am linking to and using in my “Logic Pro X – Command of the Day” blog posts.

I need to try doing “actual work” in Logic with the “helpPad” connected to see how I like it, but for my daily homework and study of Logic Pro X I am now way far ahead.

Stay tuned.

How to get help – Logic Remote for iPad

How to get help – Logic Remote for iPad:

In Logic Remote, tap the View button in the control bar, then tap Smart Help.

Make sure that the Help book is unlocked .

In Logic Pro, choose Help > Quick Help.

In Logic Pro, move the pointer over an interface item to show its name and function in the Quick Help area.

Who knew? I am stunned.

Connect an iPad with Logic Remote, open up Smart Help, have the manual automatically jump to a relevant spot for your enlightenment. Essentially saves having to type ‘⌘/’ and wait for the help window to open up.

Create Group… ⌃G – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Create Group…    ⌃G

From the “Project Audio” section of commands.

Project Audio Browser overview – Logic Pro X:

The Project Audio Browser shows all audio files and regions that have been added to or recorded in your project, whether or not they are used in the Tracks area. Regions shown in the Project Audio Browser that are not used in the Tracks area are indicated in red.

 

 Fascinating. There is an entire world of collecting and arranging audio files for a project. I am entirely used to working with collections of audio files that are used as a set, and should be contained within the project. An entire world of possibilities of creating projects with audio from many sources with no really good reason to copy into a project.

Certainly something to think about. At the minimum cataloging and filing project audio first might make a lot of sense for larger projects with original recorded tracks and processed tracks. Reference tracks?

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Is Success in Music Determined By Your Location? | FAQ Friday – Produce Like A Pro

Is Success in Music Determined By Your Location? | FAQ Friday – Produce Like A Pro:

Our featured question this week: “Do you think a certain amount of success as a producer mixer or engineer is determined by your location? Do you think there are limits to that success outside of music industry hotspots?“

Be the Bass With These Left Hand Techniques – KeyboardMag

Be the Bass With These Left Hand Techniques – KeyboardMag:

Picture this: You got the gig and you’re excited about the music. You get to your first rehearsal and the bandleader wants you to play “bass” on a couple of things. You panic because you’ve never had to be the bass player and cover your keyboard parts at the same time. I’ve been fortunate to play with some of the baddest bass players on the planet, and all of them have asked me to play bass at one time or another. To help be your own bassist, here are a few examples that will strengthen your hand independence as well as add some spice to your left hand. Always remember that as a keyboardist, you already use your left hand more than you know.

Understanding Fletcher–Munson Curves to Improve Mixes and Masters

Understanding Fletcher–Munson Curves to Improve Mixes and Masters:

Fletcher-Munson Curves, more commonly known as the Equal Loudness Curves, were discovered by Harvey Fletcher and Widen A. Munson. The discovery was from an investigation with the aim of finding the cheapest way to broadcast a telephone call.

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

When you play an acoustic guitar harder, it not only gets louder, but brighter. Dry, electric guitar doesn’t have that quality…by comparison, the electrified sound by itself is somewhat lifeless. But I’m not here to be negative! Let’s look at a solution that can give your dry electric guitar some more acoustic-like qualities.

I will investigate how to do this in Logic Pro X.

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Dynamic Brightener for Guitar – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

When you play an acoustic guitar harder, it not only gets louder, but brighter. Dry, electric guitar doesn’t have that quality…by comparison, the electrified sound by itself is somewhat lifeless. But I’m not here to be negative! Let’s look at a solution that can give your dry electric guitar some more acoustic-like qualities.

I will investigate how to do this in Logic Pro X.

Snap Regions to Relative Value – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Snap Regions to Relative Value

  I should work with some of the options for snapping audio to the grid. I struggle to align reference tracks that I put into the project. This is the visual editing of the regions…something that I don’t do a lot of yet.

It is easy to practice using MIDI loops with the region zoomed horizontally to display fine timing resolution.

Snap items to the grid – Logic Pro X:

By default, the Snap function is relative. When you move or edit an item, it retains the same relative distance from its original grid position. For example, if a region is placed at position 1.2.1.16, and you move the region two beats forward (with the Snap value set to Bar), the region snaps to position 2.2.1.16, not 2.1.1.1 (or 2.2.1.1). You can move items so that they align with the nearest grid value by choosing Snap to Absolute Value from the Snap pop-up menu.

You can show the grid in the Tracks area, to help you visualize the positions of items in the Tracks area relative to the Snap value.

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

How turn off Logic Pro X automatic tempo manipulation? – Gearslutz

How turn off Logic Pro X automatic tempo manipulation? – Gearslutz:

When the Logic guy imports our recorded tracks (recorded in different DAW) into his Logic session, Logic seems to automatically try to fit the imported tracks to Logic’s default tempo 120 (while the recording is made in tempo 85).

Select Audio Tracks – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Select Audio Tracks

 I most often select all Audio Channels in the mixer. Show ALL channel strips, turn off all but audio. Now I can select all the channels and add EQ or sends to everything at the same time.

Selecting all Audio Tracks in the arrange window would certainly be a simpler way to do this.

In the Edit menu – “Edit>Select Tracks>Audio”.

The command will only select Audio tracks that are visible in the Arrange window. If the tracks are in Summing Stacks that are collapsed they will not be selected. In fact, the Audio menu item is dimmed if there are no Audio tracks visible.

In the Mixer selecting all Audio channel strips is ‘⇧A’. The same caveat about visible channels applies. The Select All Audio only selects visible audio tracks/channels.

Still a good workflow improvement for me.

Select tracks – Logic Pro X:

 

Some track operations, such as duplicating tracks or assigning tracks to a different channel strip, require that you first select the track or tracks.

You can select multiple tracks. When multiple tracks are selected, the first selected track is the focused track. Some operations, such as choosing a patch in the Library, only affect the focused track when multiple tracks are selected.

When multiple tracks are selected, the track number of the focused track also appears selected (lighter gray color) on the left edge of the track header, unlike the other selected tracks.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

– Piano Roll – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  - Piano Roll

Include Non-Note MIDI Events
View Mode: One Track
View Mode: Selected Regions
Toggle View Mode
Toggle Time Handles ⌃T ⌃⌥⌘1⃣
Set Note Color By Region Color
Set Note Color By Velocity
Set Note Color By MIDI Channel
Define Brush Pattern and Set Brush Tool ⌃⇧B
Reset Brush Pattern ⌃⇧⌫
Toggle Collapse Mode

Today we get a “section” of commands – the Piano Roll commands.

Piano Roll Editor overview – Logic Pro X:

The Piano Roll Editor shows the notes in a MIDI region as colored bars in a time grid. Horizontal lines show the time position, while vertical lines indicate pitch. A keyboard along the left edge of the Piano Roll Editor provides a reference for the pitches of notes. The info display in the Piano Roll Editor menu bar shows the note name and time position under the pointer.

 

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND