Studio One 4 Pattern Editing | Sound on Sound

Studio One 4 Pattern Editing |:

Studio One 4 introduced pattern-based step sequencing as an alternative mode to the familiar piano-roll MIDI editor. It’s one of those features that makes you wonder why every DAW doesn’t already have it. It’s simple and intuitive in a way that’s reminiscent of the creative tools we’ve come to enjoy in hardware. Pattern-based sequencing is most often used for drums, but as we’ll see in this month’s workshop, the Pattern Sequencer in Studio One can be just as easily directed to synthesizer and instrument sounds, and can very quickly generate something unexpected.

I suspect this won’t work for folks who don’t subscribe to SOS. The link should work properly in about 6 months. It works for me today 😉

5 Creative Uses of iZotope RX in Audio Mastering

5 Creative Uses of iZotope RX in Audio Mastering:

Here are five examples of recent mastering sessions where iZotope RX took on a more creative audio mastering role. Featured in this article is GRAMMY-winning mastering engineer Glenn Schick (Future, Ludacris, The Weeknd) and iZotope’s very own Education Director Jonathan Wyner (David Bowie, Howie Day) to also share some key insights on how they’ve used RX in their mastering workflow.

6 Practical Ways to Use RX 7 for Music Production

6 Practical Ways to Use RX 7 for Music Production:

RX is used by sound designers, those in film post-production, and dialogue editing the world over. With RX 7 offering the ability to isolate vocals from songs and automatically detect noise in samples, it’s moved into the hands of creative producers too.

Today I’m sharing six of my favourite RX 7 tricks for music production, along with audio examples for evidence. I suggest using a pair of headphones to listen.

8 Creative Reverb Effects for Sound Design

8 Creative Reverb Effects for Sound Design:

The purpose of reverb is to create a sense of ambiance, foster a feeling of depth, or take listeners to new locales. But today we depart from these more prosaic usages to focus on something a little more creative—namely, how to use reverb as a tool for sound design.

Essential Tips for Using Reverb on Vocals

Essential Tips for Using Reverb on Vocals:

The vocal is often (nearly always) the most important element in a track. The presence that you hear in a professional vocal helps the listener understand the lyrics and connect with the song. This human element is accessible to the listener and should be clear to hear.

8 Tips for Using Reverbs and Delays on Guitars

8 Tips for Using Reverbs and Delays on Guitars:

Barring distortion, few effects are as essential to mixing guitars as reverb and delay. From reggae strokes to stadium rock epicness and blissful tape echo soundscapes, we’ve relied heavily on ambience processors to shape some of the most distinctive guitar sounds in contemporary music.

Copy MIDI Events… – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Copy MIDI Events…

The command is found in the “Edit” menu of the usual places – Tracks, Events, Piano Roll. Unlikely that I would turn this into a keyboard command. There are lots of things to be fiddled with.

Edit events overview – Logic Pro X:

The Event List L(ock), M(ute), Position, Status, Ch(annel), Num(ber), Val(ue), and Length/Info columns display all details of all event types. In most cases, you can directly edit the data displayed (except for the Status column, which indicates the event type).

 

 There is more detailed discussion of this in the Piano Roll documentation.

Copy notes in the Piano Roll Editor – Logic Pro X:

There are a number of ways to copy or move notes in the Piano Roll Editor. In addition to Option-dragging or using the Copy and Paste menu commands, there are advanced Copy and Move operations such as directly swapping events, or merging a group of notes from one section of a region to the same region, or another region.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Friday Tips: The Center Stage Reverb – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog

Friday Tips: The Center Stage Reverb – PreSonus BlogPreSonus Blog:

This week’s tip is inspired by the center stage sound, but taken further. The heart of the effect is the Expander, but unlike last week’s Expander-based Dynamic Brightener tip, the Expander is in Duck mode, and fed by a sidechain. Here’s the Console setup.

Add Mapping – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Add Mapping

Smart Controls. Mapping parameters to Smart Controls is kind of tedious. The benefit is the Smart Controls can be used in Logic Remote, so control is possible while away from the computer. The controls are also mappable to the Control Surfaces.

Map screen controls to channel strip and plug-in parameters – Logic Pro X:

When Show Advanced Tools is selected in the Advanced preferences pane, you can map screen controls to channel strip and plug-in parameters for the selected track. Each screen control can be mapped to one or more channel strip or plug-in parameters for the selected track. Parameter mappings are saved with the patch.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Octave – 2 ⇧Z – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Octave - 2 ⇧Z

Move the “selected” octave down 2. I’m not really sure how this is useful unless it is because it makes it easier to see the location of keys on the keyboard.

I am more likely to be using the “Musical Typing” keyboard.

Step Input Keyboard – Logic Pro X:

Table reflects default keyboard shortcuts included in the U.S. factory preset.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Apply Transform User Preset 4 to selected Events – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Apply Transform User Preset 4 to selected Events

The MIDI Transform window. All things programatic start here. It appears that we can define 30 presets for the transformation window. It would be good to remember the variant “Select and Operate Preset”. See tomorrow’s post.

 

MIDI Transform window overview – Logic Pro X:

The MIDI Transform window is so-named because it transforms MIDI events—based on conditions, operations, and values you choose—into different types of events, or events with different values.

The MIDI Transform window is a powerful tool for edits that would otherwise be impossible (or tedious). For example, imagine an orchestral project that has been sent to you for editing. The individual violin and viola parts were recorded with a different string library. Two hundred MIDI regions contain aftertouch information that introduces an unpleasant pitch modulation, and some sample layer switching artifacts when played with your string samples. After looking at this aftertouch information, you discover that only a small range of values is causing the problem. Your options: edit your sampler instruments, manually remove all aftertouch information (region by region, or globally, thus losing the performance benefits that the aftertouch information provides), or alter the problematic values in the MIDI Transform window.

A number of preset transform sets are available for many common editing tasks. These may be all you’ll ever require, but should the need arise, you can create and save your own transform sets, and recall them later.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

How to Ace the “Static Mix”: Get Levels & Panning Right the 1st Time — SonicScoop

How to Ace the “Static Mix”: Get Levels & Panning Right the 1st Time — SonicScoop:

In this article, I’m going to show you how to nail the most important step in mixing. If you want high-quality mixes, getting the volume balance right (also known as the “static mix”) is crucial.

Multi-Band Compression And Dynamic EQ – Do You Know The Difference? Many People Don’t

Production Expert | Multi-Band Compression And Dynamic EQ – Do You Know The Difference? Many People Don’t:

Here are three hypothetical audio issues. Because they only present themselves some of the time, regular compression or EQ often don’t fix them satisfactorily. Do you use a multi-band compressor or a dynamic EQ to fix them?

I have dynamic EQs and multi-band compressors. I should know the difference and when to use them.

Solo Mode ⌃S – Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day

Logic Pro X keyboard command of the day. #LogicProX @StudioIntern1

  Solo Mode    ⌃S

Solo the selected region(s). I have learned to use the Solo Tool for listening to tracks to investigate. Using Solo Mode will help me during mixing and editing.

Mute and solo regions in the Tracks area – Logic Pro X:

You can mute one or more regions in the Tracks area to exclude them from playback. You can also solo individual regions, to hear them in isolation, and lock the solo status of regions.

 

 

⇧ SHIFT  –  ⌃ CONTROL  –  ⌥ OPTION  –  ⌘ COMMAND

Logic Pro | E is For EQ

Logic Pro | E is For EQ:

Equalizers are the most fundamental tool we have to shape the sound flowing through our tracks. There are different types, shapes, curves, and controls, but they all fundamentally do the same thing. Boost or attenuate specific areas of the frequency spectrum.